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YEARBOOK 1961 




1962 

FLOWER SHOWS 

of the 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 






January 11 and 12 
Camellia Show 

March 17 through 25 

Wonderland Park, Revere 

Spring Show 

May 7 and 8 
Daffodil Show 

May 21 and 22 
Tulip Show 

June 7 and 8 
Iris Show 

June 18 and 19 
Rose Show 

July 25 
Hemerocallis Show 

August 10 and 11 
Gladiolus Show 

August 22 and 23 
Children's Show 

October 18 through 21 
Harvest and Chrysanthemum Show 

(Dates subject to change) 



■ \ 



2 i i* 



1961 YEARBOOK 

of the 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS 



for 

I960 



AND A LIST OF BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 



FORWORD— The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the 
honor to present herewith the 37th number of the Society's Yearbook, 
with which are combined the annual reports for the year 1960. 

Boston, Massachusetts, August 1, 1961, Edward Dane, Chairman 



al*" 




Crontin Photo 



Robert N. El well 
Elected a Trustee, May 1, 1961 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society 

Results of the Balloting 8 

Reports of Officers and Committees 8 

President's Address 9 

Report of the Secretary 10 

Report of Committee on Exhibitions 12 

Report of Committee on Prizes 14 

Report of Committee on Children's Gardens 16 

Special Medal Awards 18 

Garden Committee Awards 20 

Awards of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 27 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1960 30 

Report of the Treasurer 37 

Report of Committee on Library 40 

Books Added to the Library 41 

Gifts to the Library 49 

Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 51 

Honorary Members 54 

Necrology 55 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 57 

Photos by Genereux and Fay Foto 

Our Cover Illustration 

Spectacular formal garden, with striking fountain, in the plastic air- 
dome at the 1961 Spring Flower Show. Staged by Barlett Gardens, 
Incorporated, Hamilton, Massachusetts. 

Photo by Genereux 
3 




Harold D. Stevenson, left, presenting the Gold Medal of the Horticultural 
Society of New York to Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for a group 

of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, right, presenting the Bulkley Medal of the Garden 

Club of America to Mrs. Roger S. Warner, for the Women's Exhibitions 

Committee exhibit at the Spring Show. 




THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Vice Presidents 

EDWARD DANE 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 



Trustees 



Oliver F. Ames (1964) 
Albert C. Burrage ( 1963 ) 
Edward Dane* 
Robert N. El well (1964) 
Dr. John R. Havis (1962) 
Allen W. Hixon (1963) 
Walter Hunnewell (1963) 
Seth L. Kelsey (1963) 
Harold W. Knowlton* 



Milford R. Lawrence (1962) 
Miss Helen C. Moseley (1964) 
Harold S. Ross (1962) 
Harold D. Stevenson (1962) 
Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1962) 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster (1964) 
Sargent Wellman (1963) 
Oliver Wolcott* 
Dr. Donald Wyman (1964) 



Treasurer 
EDWARD DANE 

Assistant Treasurer 
OLIVER F. AMES 



Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 

° Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 




Mr. Albert C. Burrage, right, presenting the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 
to Peter Mezitt, Weston Nurseries, for the most outstanding exhibit in the 

Spring Flower Show. 




Informal Garden in a naturalistic setting, staged by Peter Mezitt, Weston 

Nurseries at the Spring Flower Show 

Awarded the President's Cup 



6 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 1, 1962 

Executive Committee 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

OLIVER F. AMES WALTER HUNNEWELL 

EDWARD DANE HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 

Finance Committee 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

OLIVER F. AMES EDWARD DANE 

Budget Committee 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

OLIVER F. AMES WALTER HUNNEWELL 

EDWARD DANE HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 

Committee on Building 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON SARGENT WELLMAN 

Membership Committee 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON, Chairman 

ALLEN W. HIXON HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Exhibitions 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON, Chairman 

EDWARD DANE SETH L. KELSEY 

DR. JOHN R. HAVIS MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

Committee on Prizes 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE, Chairman 

JOHN HURLEY, Co-chairman 

ALLEN W. HIXON HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 

JAMES SUTHERLAND 

Committee on Library 
ALRERT C. RURRAGE, Chairman 

ROBERT N. ELWELL MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON SARGENT WELLMAN 

DR. DONALD WYMAN 

Committee on Lectures and Publications 
EDWARD DANE, Chairman 

OLIVER F. AMES HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Special Medals 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 

Committee on Gardens 
DR. DONALD WYMAN, Chairman 

ALEXANDER I. HEIMLICH A. W. SMITH 

MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 

MRS. CHARLES F. HOVEY HENRY G. WENDLER 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

ALRERT C. RURRAGE, Chairman 

DR. JOHN R. HAVIS MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY 

JOHN HURLEY HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Nominating Committee 

SETH L. KELSEY, Chairman 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE WALTER HUNNEWELL 

ALLEN W. HIXON SARGENT WELLMAN 

7 



Results of the Balloting at the Annual Meeting 

At 4 o'clock the polls were closed, 75 votes having been cast, and 

the following persons were declared elected: 
President: (for one year) Mr. Oliver Wolcott 
Vice President: (for two years) Mr. Harold W. Knowlton 
Trustees: (for three years) Mr. Oliver F. Ames, Mr. Robert N. Elwell, 

Miss Helen C. Moseley, Mrs. Edwin S. Webster and Dr. Donald Wyman. 






Reports of Officers and Committees 
Presented at the Annual Meeting, May I, 1961 

The Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
held at Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 1, 1961, at 3 p.m., with the 
Vice President, Mr. Edward Dane, presiding, in the absence of Mr. Oliver 
Wolcott, President. He appointed as tellers Miss Beverly Christian, Mrs. 
Margaret Foran and Mrs. Claire Rochef ort. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the 
meeting. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous Annual Meet- 
ing was waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 




Edward Dane, left, presenting Peter Mezitt the President's Cup for the 
most meritorious exhibit in the 1961 Spring Show. 



8 



The President's Address 



— ~^rom the point of view of the activities of the Society, 1960 was 
i an excellent year. Our Shows, led by the Spring Show, were 
of high quality, the Garden Committee found gardens well 
worthy of its awards and of the visits of our membership, our lec- 
tures and courses were well attended, and the library maintained 
its excellence. 

Financially, however, the slight profit of 1959 turned to a substan- 
tial loss in 1960. Our membership decline, though greatly slowed, 
still continued and some of the economies in the promotional ex- 
pense of Horticulture which caused its small profit in 1959 resulted 
in a drop of circulation in 1960 that brought a substantial loss. 

These problems are engaging the attention of your Trustees and 
Committees and so far this year the results of Horticulture are much 
improved. 

I am sorry to say that 1961's outstanding Spring Show did not 
produce the profit that it merited but its quality reflects great credit 
on our exhibitors, our staff and our committees. 

In concluding, may I express the thanks of the Society to all of 
them and particularly to the Revere Racing Association, Incorpor- 
ated, for their generosity in again contributing their facilities. 

Oliver Wolcott 
President 






9 




Report of the Secretary 

s your Executive Secretary, it becomes my privilege to report on the 
activities of the Society during the past year. With the ever in- 
creasing interest in gardening, the demand for information on the 
part of our members as well as our subscribers to HORTICULTURE con- 
tinues to increase. Requests for information on various horticultural prob- 
lems come from nearly every state in the union as well as many foreign 
countries. Although many of these projects are time consuming, we con- 
sider them a challenge and we endeavor to help solve them to the best 
of our ability. 

Your officers and members of the staff are still greatly concerned over 
the loss in membership that has occurred during the past two years. A 
new approach was developed by the Membership Committee which in- 
cluded an attractive invitation in color, but it did not bring the desired 
results. In recent months, however, the influx of new members has kept 
pace with the resignations. The Membership Committee seeks your as- 
sistance in helping obtain new members. Please explain the advantages of 
membership to your friends and neighbors. 

The financial report on our magazine, HORTICULTURE, for last year 
was not too encouraging. We carried on a campaign to obtain new sub- 
scribers which proved to be costly compared to the returns we obtained. 
We have now adopted an entirely new subscription program which has 
been most satisfactory for the first three months of this year. If we can 
continue this program for the balance of the year, HORTICULTURE will 
definitely be on a sound financial basis. 

I am happy to report that the renovation plan for the library, under 
the direction of the Library Committee, has been brought to a successful 
conclusion. The availability of additional shelf space has made it pos- 
sible for Miss Manks, our librarian, to transfer several thousand books to 
storage stacks. The additional space in the reading room makes it possible 
to take care of the new books for a good many years. 

A number of important improvements to the building were made in the 
course of the year. The foyer was treated to a new coat of paint. The 
color was carefully selected by the Committee on Building and we have 
had many favorable comments on the effect that has been created. Other 
rooms in the building need painting but this will be deferred until next 
year. 

A folding door at the base of the stairs on the mezzanine floor is an addi- 
tion that should be noted. This folding door makes it possible to keep 
people from going upstairs and into the library at times when it is closed, 
but the mezzanine floor is being used by organizations occupying space on 
that floor for meetings and lectures. To know that people cannot wander 
around upstairs and in our library when there is no one in attendance 
gives the staff a feeling of security. 

The installation of new electric circuits from the street into various 
parts of the building was the major improvement of the year. The old 

10 



Report of the Secretary 

wires had reached the point where we never knew when they would give 
out so this remodeling was an absolute necessity. The work includes new 
switches at convenient locations for use when additional light is necessary 
for lectures and exhibitions. 

In the way of information on practical gardening, Mrs. Lucien B. Tay- 
lor has continued her courses on outdoor as well as greenhouse gardening. 
Members are eligible to enroll in these courses for a very small fee. Early 
registrations are recommended and should be addressed to Mrs. Laura 
R. Hatton, Horticultural Hall, Boston 15, Massachusetts. 

The winter and spring lecture series by the Committee on Lectures and 
Publications has never been more popular. The attendance continues to 
increase and the interest is most encouraging. In this series, a new feature 
consisted of a demonstration lecture for decorating the home for Christ- 
mas by Mrs. Chester Cook. It was staged in conjunction with an exhibit 
of Christmas Decorations and of Christmas Greens from the Arnold Arbo- 
retum. This exhibit was staged by Mrs. Donald Wyman, Mrs. Chester 
Cook and a committee of Garden Club Members. This was the most suc- 
cessful Christmas Show ever staged by the Society and it was exception- 
ally well attended. 

The Board of Directors of Wonderland Park invited the Society to 
again hold its 1962 Spring Flower Show at Wonderland Park in Revere. 
The Society accepted the invitation and decided with its two years of 
background it would be in a position to improve on many of the details 
involved in staging the Show. A further report on the Spring Show will 
be presented by Mr. Harold D. Stevenson, Chairman of the Committee 
on Exhibitions. 

As in former years, the Society is sponsoring ten summer and fall shows 
in our own building. The Hemerocallis Show is the newcomer in the 
schedule and because of the increased interest in this popular flower the 
Show is being continued. 

The Annual Field Trip to the Arnold Arboretum is one of the most 
successful projects sponsored by the Society. It is being continued this 
year and buses will be available to members for visiting the many plant 
collections in different sections of the Arboretum. A staff member, includ- 
ing both Dr. Howard and Dr. Wyman, will be in charge of each bus to 
answer questions as the caravan proceeds. This plan was followed last 
year and proved most successful. 

A number of gardens Were recognized by the Society this past year 
and the owners have invited members of the Society to visit their gardens 
on May 26 and 27. A list of these gardens with specific directions for 
reaching them is being mailed to all members. 

The Society wishes to recognize a new award offered by Mrs. John S. 
Ames in memory of her late husband. The terms under which the award 
is to be given are as follows : 



11 



Report of the Secretary 

The John S. Ames Trophy is to be awarded, when merited, to a 
plant or plants of outstanding horticultural interest exhibited at any 
of the Shows of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. In making 
this award, preference shall be given to plants hardy in Massachu- 
setts. 
A great honor has come to one of the members of our Board of Trustees. 
Mr. Albert C. Burrage was awarded the Garden Club of America Distin- 
guished Service Medal, at a meeting of this organization held last month 
in New York City. 

In closing, I wish to thank the Trustees and the Chairmen of the various 
Committees for their wonderful cooperation. My sincerest thanks are also 
extended to the members of the staff for their interest and loyalty in be- 
half of the Society. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 



Report of the Committee on Exhiritions 

It is human nature to make a lengthy report on any project or activity 
when conditions are favorable and inversely to make a short one when 
circumstances are unpropitious. 

This year it should be a short one, especially in reference to the Spring 
Flower Show. 

But first may I report on the other shows held at Horticultural Hall 
during the year. Without going into detail regarding the other nine shows, 
all of which were excellent, it is a pleasure to note there was an increase 
in attendance of nearly 1,800 people. 

Now, regarding the Spring Show, this normally is the source of our 
largest income received from shows held during the year. Over the past 
twenty-seven years this is the first time, to my knowledge, that we have 
lost money on this particular show. 

The question is— Why? I think it can be summed up in one word- 
attendance. The Committee in planning the Show felt that with more ex- 
hibit space, provided by the Air-dome, plus an additional day, attend- 
ance would increase from the 85,000 people recorded last year to 100,000 
for this year. Instead it dropped to 80,000, a loss of approximately 2,000 
people per day. Two factors contributed to this: First— Location— while 
it is a New England Flower Show, it is not readily accessible to the Bos- 
ton public who used to drop in for an hour or so. Second— Bad weather 
—two stormy days resulted in a very small attendance, especially for one 
day when only 3,000 were present. This of course is a serious setback to 
our income. 

12 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

Because of the Air-dome we incurred considerable expense which was 
not offset by the publicity value we anticipated. Nevertheless, from com- 
ments heard during and after the Show, the public liked the exhibits; 
the genera] arrangement, and the ease of seeing the Show much better 
than last year, which is very gratifying to the Committee. Even if it isn't 
the largest flower show, we do strive to make it the best. Credit for this 
and all our other good shows belongs to the exhibitors, who do their ut- 
most to maintain quality in the plant material shown, who use artistic 
arrangement and give attention to the detail of finishing up which is often 
missing at shows in other sections of the country. 

The facilities of Wonderland Park have been offered again for the 1962 
Spring Show. While it may not be the ideal place for our purposes, we 
are grateful to accept their kind offer and go ahead with plans for next 
year. Incidentally, next year's date will be one week later, which we hope 
will give us better weather. We will have to be more conservative to put 
it back on a sound financial basis. 

My appreciation is extended to Mr. Arno Nehrling, to his staff, to the 
members of the Exhibition Committee, to Mr. Elmer Ziegler and his men, 
for the extra effort in setting up the Air-dome and to many others for their 
cooperation and interest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold D. Stevenson, Chairman 
Committee on Exhibitions 




Educational fruit exhibit, staged by the New York State Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 
Awarded a Gold Medal 



13 



o : 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

n behalf of the Committee on Prizes we again respectfully submit 
our annual report of this Committee's activities during the past 
year. 

As always, our assigned duty of appointing judges has been a pleas- 
ant one, and the gratitude of the Society goes to the many competent 
horticulturalists who have served well and willingly in that capacity. Their 
competence has been demonstrated by their conscientious work and by the 
wide approval with which their decisions have been accepted. 

Most noteworthy is the continuing high caliber of exhibits in all the 
shows, large and small, during the past year, fully maintaining the stand- 
ards for which the Massachusetts Horticultural Society's exhibitions are 
noted. 

Making the awards of medals, trophies and special prizes is a function 
which this Committee finds less simple and more challenging than ever. 
We are inclined to emphasize once again our belief that awards of the 
Society's Silver and Bronze medals should be interpreted as high honors ! 
indicating superior quality, thus still further increasing the significance of 
the Gold medals. 

Further encouragement may well be given to the use of simple display 
cards to be posted with appropriate exhibits, setting forth briefly the in- 
tended themes of those exhibits. They add informative interest and pro- 
mote interpretive appreciation of the observer. 

The members of the Committee on Prizes are most appreciative of the 
honor of serving the Society in this capacity, and as always, we are most 
grateful for the unfailing cooperation and help of the Officers, Trustees 
and other Committees of the Society and especially of the Executive 
Secretary, Mr. Nehrling and his competent staff. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Milford R. Lawrence, Chairman 
Committee on Prizes 






14 




Semi-formal spring bulb garden, staged by Breck's, Boston at the Spring 

Flower Show. 

Awarded a Silver Medal 

Carnation arrangements display, staged by the New England Carnation 
Growers' Association, at the 1960 Fall Harvest Show. 




15 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

WeatherwisEj the 1960 garden season was not unusual but, ex- 
hibition-wise, it was a most unusual year. This abnormal condi- 
tion was brought about because of budgetary problems due to 
the Mayor's austerity program. Unwillingly, all gardening activities were 
deleted from the budget except the large garden project on the Cum- 
mings Estate in Woburn. Sufficient funds were allowed to operate this 
very unique and most worthwhile project on a restricted basis. 

What effect would this drastic action have on the annual Children's 
Exhibition in August was the big question. The Boston School Garden at 
Woburn, Brockton Home and School Gardens and the 4H Garden Club 
members of Eastern Massachusetts went all out at this annual event. 
When the final count was > taken, the 1960 Children's Exhibition had 
nearly 1,100 high quality entries— a drop of only 200 from the previous 
year. Some of the high entry classes were green tomatoes 55, summer 
squash 34, beets 22, cucumbers 22 and African marigolds 18. These all 
provided ample competition for the various groups of judges. 

The outstanding exhibit of the Children's Show came from the Boston I 
Public School Garden at the old Cummings Estate in Woburn. Staged 
by the children under the supervision of Miss Catherine M. Maney and 
her assistants, this exhibit was awarded the Society's Gold Medal and a 
Special Medallion from the Department of Agriculture 

At the annual Harvest and Chrysanthemum Show in October, the chil- 
dren and staff of the same garden staged a 200-square-foot display con- 
taining many varieties of vegetables, a 50-square-foot educational squash 
exhibit and a 50-square-foot educational vegetable exhibit. The caliber 
of the exhibits is shown by the awards given them. The three exhibits 
won a First Prize, two Special Prizes and a Gold Medal. This is a fine 
example of what children can do in adult competition with the proper 
instruction and guidance. In the individual classes at the same show, 33 
entries netted 29 prizes, consisting of 12 firsts, 14 seconds and 3 specials. 

The 4H Club section filled the upper hall at the Children's Show and 
showed an increase of 40 entries over the previous year. Here again green 
tomatoes were the popular class with 34 entries, followed by cucumbers 
with 28 entries and summer squash with 22 entries. 

Vocational agricultural students at the high school level from the Ja- 
maica Plain High School and the Norfolk County Agricultural High 
School, under the guidance of their instructors, staged excellent exhibits 
at the 1960 New England Spring Flower Show. Here again we have 
juniors participating with adults at the adult level in the greatest horti- 
cultural show of the Northeast. There is no better way of acquainting 
the adult exhibitor of tomorrow with showmanship. 

With special thanks to the garden teachers, supervisors, 4H Club lead- 
ers and the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

Henry G. Wendler 

for the 

Committee on Children's Gardens 

16 




Genereux Photo 



Arrangement of red ginger blooms and bird's nest fern foli- 
age by Mrs. Roger Richardson, Attleboro, at the 1961 

Spring Show. 



17 



Special Medal Awards 



The George Robert White 
Medal of Honor 

To Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, 
Pennsylvania, the creation of Pierre S. du Pont, 
and through his wise planning perpetuated by 
him for the enjoyment of the general public. 
Within this thousand-acre tract one may find 
a wide diversity of exceptional plant material, 
arranged with skill and dignity. This rare 
beauty spot is a truly magnificent example of 
the finest in landscape architecture. 





Dr. J. Russell Seibert, Director 



Autumn 
display of 
chrysanthemums 
at Longwood 
Gardens 




The Thomas Roland Medal 

To Theodore Payne, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, a lifelong specialist in California 
wild flowers and native plants. He has fo- 
cused his natural and exceptional skill in 
horticulture on the development and the 
distribution of these native plants, and over 
the years he has introduced four hundred 
or more of them into general cultivation. 



Theodore Payne 



18 



Special Medal Awards 




Dr. Clement Gray Bowers 



The Jackson Dawson Medal 

To Dr. Clement Gray Bowers, 
Maine, New York, eminent plant 
scientist, author, and a hybridizer 
of note. He is a world authority on 
rhododendrons and azaleas, and a 
distinguished horticulturist along 
broad lines. His book "Rhododen- 
drons and Azaleas," recently re- 
vised, is one of the true classics 
of garden literature. 




The Society's 
Large Gold Medal 

To Frederick Frye Rockwell, 
Orleans, Massachusetts, noted 
horticulturist, author, editor, and 
practical gardener. Through his 
ability to write of the things that 
interest amateur gardeners in 
general, he has materially broad- 
ened the knowledge of good gar- 
dening throughout the United 
States. 




Frederick Frye Rockwell 



19 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recommen- 
dation of the Committee on Gardens, Dr. Donald Wyman, Chairman. 



The if. H. Hunnewell Medal 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ben: P. P. Moseley, Ipswich. An estate showing the 
splendid results of intelligent care and interest of its two owners who have 
built it together over the years. Tasteful plantings on the side of a hill, 
well-grown specimen trees and shrubs of many kinds, long walks bordered 
with hundreds of hybrid rhododendrons in the best of condition, well- 
planned vistas off to the ocean, flower gardens and long expanses of lawns, 
all combine to make this one of the best gardens in the area. 



The Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 

To Mr. and Mrs. George Sibley, Brookline. An outstanding example of 
a porch and terrace attached to a modern house in such a way that gar- 
den features are major points of interest, not only from the porch and 
terrace but from inside the house, as well. Excellent design has been aug- 
mented with the use of fine plant material to feature the best garden focal 
points in the house by the use of picture windows at several vantage points. 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Ben: P. P. Moseley, Ipswich 
Awarded the H. H. Hunnewell Medal 



20 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Society s Gold Medal 

To Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Clark, Brookline. The garden is situated on a 
narrow lot at the rear of a large, English-type house. One looks down from 
a formal terrace across a rolling lawn bordered by mature trees on either 
side. Dignified in every line, displaying the natural beauty of the trees at 
their best, this old planting shows excellent design, yet results in simple 
care. 

To Mrs. Lawrence W. Churchill, Belmont. A mature garden on part 
of a large estate, showing how good planning over forty years ago has re- 
sulted in a beautiful garden today. A colorful rose garden and a lilac 
garden have been featured near the house and are surrounded with ma- 
ture ornamental trees in excellent condition. Beautiful lawns are transi- 
tional between the formal gardens and surrounding woodlands, everything 
showing good taste and a good choice of color. 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. George Sibley, Brookline 
Awarded the Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 



21 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Clark, Brooldine 
Awarded a Gold Medal 




Garden of Mrs. Lawrence W. Churchill, Belmont 
Awarded a Gold Medal 



22 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Society s Silver Medal 

To Mr. and Mis. Charles F. Rowley, Brookline. A delightful sunken 
garden with rock walls and definite horizontal lines, colorful in the spring 
as well as in the fall and maintained in perfect condition for many years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George Batchelder, Jr., Beverly. Overlooking Wenham 
Lake, this estate displays the use of trees in border plantings. The long, 
winding entrance road, the many dogwoods, azaleas and mountain laurel 
used to fine advantage, the interesting tree peony garden with its lily 
pool, all have been worked into a dignified whole. 

To Berkeley Residence Club, Boston. A small but beautiful garden off 
the main lobby of a busy metropolitan residence club, hidden from the 
street by high brick walls, but quiet and restful, with its shaded table and 
chairs, this shows an ingenious use of plant materials and the result of 
perfect care. 

To Shopper's World, Incorporated, Framingham. One of the first shop- 
ping centers in New England, this has featured good plants ever since its 
inception in 1951. Well kept in every sense of the word, the specimen 
trees and shrubs, both on the outside of the buildings . and in the main 
quadrangle, have always added beauty to otherwise strictly commercial 
buildings. 



The Society's Bronze Medal 

To Mr. and Mrs. David H. Smith, Swampscott. A garden on a corner 
lot in a built-up area, yet hidden from the street and featuring extremely 
well-grown azaleas and evergreens, with accompanying ground covers, 
combined in such a way as to be beautiful at all times of the year, yet very 
easily cared for. 

To Mrs. Henry G. Powning, Manchester. A beautifully designed garden 
in crowded Manchester with three long divisions separated by Arbor-vitae 
hedging. The main garden is notable for crab-apples on either side, long 
edgings of privet and yew, with clipped box specimens, giving the effect 
of great length. 

To Mrs. Charles Dutch, Winchester. A small, yet quiet and dignified 
garden in good taste, showing the use of finely grown plants about a small 
house and open terrace. 

To Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Reading. An ornamental plant- 
ing about a modern commercial publishing house a few feet off busily 
travelled Route 128, where the natural rock outcroppings and old apple 
trees from a former orchard have been featured. Bright annuals and peren- 
nials, together with shrubs, have been added to keep building and garden 
very definitely in scale together and make an obviously colorful planting 
at all times. 

23 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. George Batchelder, Jr., Beverly 




Garden of Berkeley Residence Club, Boston Y.W.C.A. 




Garden of Shopper's World, Incorporated, Framingham 

24 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. David H. Smith, Swampscott 




Ornamental Planting of Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Reading 



25 




Mr. George Batchelder, Jr., left, Beverly, accepting the Society's Silver 
Medal, from Dr. Donald Wyman. 

Frederick Frye Rockwell, left, Orleans, accepting the Society's Large Gold 
Medal, from Harold W. Knowlton. 




26 



Awards of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

The George Robert White Medal of Honor is considered the highest horticultural 
award in America and is given once a year by the Board of Trustees of the 
Society to the man or woman, commercial firm or institution, in the world that 
has done the most in the opinion of the Trustees to advance interest in horti- 
culture in its broadest sense. The gold medal was designed in 1909. First 
recipient was Prof. Charles S. Sargent, Director of the Arnold Arboretum. 

The Jackson Dawson Medal is awarded from time to time by the vote of the 
Trustees, for skill in the science and practice of hybridization and propagation 
of hardy, woody plants. The first medal was awarded in 1927 to Lambertus C. 
Bobbink, Rutherford, New Jersey. 

The Thomas Roland Medal is awarded from time to time to men and women 
who have shown exceptional skill in horticulture. It was designed by Mrs. Oakes 
Ames in 1927 and was presented that year to Thomas Roland, Nahant, Mass. 
Its face bears appropriately the representation of a cypripedium orchid, Mr. 
Roland having been particularly fond of cypripediums. 

The Large Gold Medal is the highest award of the Society awarded by the vote 
of the Trustees on recommendation of the Committee on Gardens, for gardens 
showing unusual skill in arrangement and management; and on vote of the 
Trustees to garden superintendents who have done eminent service in the pro- 
motion of horticulture. It is also awarded to persons, institutions and commercial 
firms for eminent horticultural accomplishments or for outstanding service to this 
Society. This medal was first awarded in 1845. 

The H. H. Hunnewell Medal is awarded from time to time to the owners of 
estates of not less than three acres in extent who shall lay out and plant them 
with the most rare and desirable ornamental trees and shrubs, in the most taste- 
ful and effective manner, developing the capabilities of the locations in the 
highest degree, and presenting the most successful examples of science, skill and 
taste, as applied to the embellishment of a country residence; the trees to be 
under the most thorough cultivation, the grounds in high keeping, and the prize 
to apply equally in cases where proprietors take professional advice, as well as 
when acting on their own judgment in their improvements. The first medal, 
designed by John Paramino, was given to the Hunnewell family. 

The Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal is awarded for the best display of flowering or 
foliage plants. Both commercial and private gardeners are eligible. 

Gold Medal Certificates Given during the war instead of Gold Medals and also 
given to exhibitors who have already received an Exhibition Gold Medal. 

Garden Certificate Designed in 1924, and given on vote of the Trustees to men, 
women or firms that have been reported during the current year as performing 
notable work in some phase of horticulture or as having notable gardens. 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase is awarded each year by the Trustees at a 
meeting in December for the most outstanding exhibit in any of the shows of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society held during that year. The size of the vase, 
which is a craftsman's piece and handmade, varies somewhat with the value of 
the gold. Although it was given by Mr. Burrage in 1930, the original vase was 
awarded under the name of the "Massachusetts Horticultural Society's Gold 
Cup" to Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Burrage for a tropical garden at the Centennial 
Exhibition in 1929. 

The President's Cup is optional and given at the discretion of the President. 

27 



AWARDS of the 




MASSACHUSETTS H 






George Robert White 
Medal of Honor 








Jackson Dawson Medal 




Thomas Roland Medal 




President's Cup 



m 



sun 1 - 



OxAj£.>kJly 



28 



JLTURAL SOCIETY 




v O>*A*jf%, 



%i 









§;§§1 

|I§§£ 



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H.H. Hunnewell Medal 





Large Gold Medal 




Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal 



Gold Medal 
Certificate 



h , ) I *} 1*- 






Garden Certificate 




Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 



29 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1960 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Weston Nurseries, Incorporated, Hopkinton, for an informal garden, the 
most outstanding exhibit in 1960. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, for eminent service to 
horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Mr. Theodore Payne, Los Angeles, California, for exceptional skill in horti- 
culture. 

Jackson Dawson Medal 

Dr. Clement Gray Bowers, Maine, New York, for his contributions to the 
science of plant propagation. 

Gold Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. Lawrence W. Churchill, Belmont, for a mature garden showing wise 
planning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Clark, Brookline, for a dignified garden of excellent 
design. 

Mr. Frederick Frye Rockwell, Orleans, for eminent horticultural accom- 
plishments. 

Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. George Batchelder, lr., Beverly, for a well-planted garden. 

Berkeley Residence Club, Boston, for a restful garden in busy Boston. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Rowley, Brookline, for a sunken garden. 

Shopper's World, Incorporated, Framingham, for creating beauty with 
well-grown plant material. 

Bronze Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Addison- Wesley Publishing Company, Reading, for an attractive ornamen- 
tal planting. 

Mrs. Charles Dutch, Winchester, for a small but choice garden. 

Mrs. Henry G. Powning, Manchester, for a beautifully designed garden. 

Mr. and Mrs. David H. Smith, Swampscott, for a garden beautiful the 
year 'round. 

30 




Dr. Clement Gray Bowers, left, Maine, New York, accepting the Jackson 
Dawson Medal from Arno H. Nehrling. 




:■.,-..,■ -m^'" ■;■■■■*■:■ "iW 

: ,MJ§Mf "i 



William Jennings, right, accepting, for Wellesley College, the Bulkley 
Medal of the Garden Club of America from Harold D. Stevenson. 



31 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1960 

Certificate of Appreciation 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Revere Racing Association, Incorporated, for furnishing its Plant for the 
Spring Flower Show and in gratitude for this public service in support 
of horticulture. 

H. H. Hunnewell Medal 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben: P. P. Moseley, Ipswich, for an estate showing rare 
skill and beauty. 

The Albert C. Burr age Porch Prize 

Mr. and Mrs. George Sibley, Brookline, for skill in designing their porch 

and terrace. 

The President's Cup 

Weston Nurseries, Incorporated, Hopkinton, for an informal garden in a 
naturalistic setting, the most meritorious exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
Horticultural Society of New York 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for a group of orchids, the most 
beautiful exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for an informal rock garden, an exhibit 
of special merit which stimulates an interest in horticulture in the Spring 
Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Seeds and Weeds Garden Club, Concord, for the most charming garden 
club exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

Chestnut Hill Garden Club, for the exhibit in the Garden Club Section 
displaying the greatest horticultural excellence at the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Prize 

Gardner Museum, Boston, for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 

Trophy of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Kelsey-Highlands Nursery, East Boxford, for a naturalistic exhibit at the 
Spring Show. 

Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club of America 

Wellesley College, Department of Biology and Bacteriology, for an educa- 
tional exhibit of ferns and fern allies, an exhibit of special merit, at the 
Spring Show. 

32 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1960 

The Beatrix Farrand Silver Bowl 

('Kerry Hill Nurseries, West Newbury, for Kaempferi azaleas, the best 
exhibit of azaleas or rhododendrons in the Spring Show. 

John Taylor Arms Award 

Mrs. Ransom Rowe, Dover Garden Club, for the blue ribbon entry receiv- 
ing the highest number of points at the Spring Flower Show. 

Best Blooms 

Camellia Lotus, exhibited by Mr. Cameron and Mrs. J. D. Cameron Brad- 
ley, Southboro. 

Daffodil Yellow Sun, exhibited by Breck's, Boston. 

Hemerocallis Honor Guard, exhibited by Mrs. Irving W. Fraim, Waltham. 

Iris La Negra Flor, exhibited by Mrs. Preston E. Corey, Reading. 

Tulip Aristocrat, exhibited by The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Bos- 
ton. . 

Gold Medals 

American Hemerocallis Society, Region 4, for flower arrangement section. 

Arcadian Gardens, New York, for their exhibit at the International Flower 
Show. 

Arthur A. Arenius, for the most meritorious exhibit in the Gladiolus Show. 

Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for an educational 
apple exhibit. 

Bartlett Gardens, Incorporated, for a formal chrysanthemum garden. 

Bartlett Gardens, Incorporated, for an informal patio garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Boston Market Gardeners' Association, for an educational vegetable ex- 
hibit. 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables from 
a school garden. 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables and 
flowers. 

Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for an educational exhibit of cacti and succulents at 
the Spring Show. 

Cider Hill Greenhouses, York, Maine, for a group of saintpaulias at the 
Spring Show., 

33 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1960 



Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dane, for a group of odontoglossums at the Spring 
Show. 

Fishelson, Florist, for a European flower stall at the Spring Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Neil M. MacLaren, Chair- 
man), for a group of flower arrangements based on the theme "The 
New England Story" at the Spring Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Percy I. Merry, Chair- 
man), for the flower arrangement section of the Fall Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Robert G. Richards, 
Chairman ) , for the flower arrangement section of the Rose Show. 

Garden Club of Philadelphia, for their exhibit at the Philadelphia Flower 
Show. 

Gardner Museum, for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for an informal rock garden at the Spring Show. 

Johnson Brothers Rose Growers, for a display of roses at the Spring Show. 

Kelsey-Highlands Nursery, for a naturalistic exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Arthur Leiby's Nursery & Garden Shop, for an informal garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Committee 
(Miss Rachael Warner, Chairman), for a series of small gardens at the 
Spring Show. 

The Merrys, for a display of decorative arrangements. 

National Association of Gardeners, Boston Branch, for an herb garden at 
the Spring Show. 

National Association of Gardeners, Cape Cod Branch, for an informal gar- 
den at the Spring Show. 

New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York, for 
an educational fruit exhibit. 

Old Colony Landscape Service, Incorporated, for an informal spring gar- 
den at the Spring Show. 

Park Florist, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a formal exhibit of acacias at the 
Spring Show. 

34 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1960 



Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Wellesley College, Department of Botany and Bacteriology, for an educa- 
tional exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Weston Nurseries, Incorporated, for an informal garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Silver Medals 

Bay State Nurseries, Incorporated, for an informal exhibit at the Spring 
Show. 

Breck's, for a semi-formal exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Carroll's Florist (at Manchester) , for the most outstanding exhibit. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for a semi-formal garden at the Spring Show. 

The Flower Bouquet, for a display of carnation arrangements at the 
Spring Show. 

Gardeners' & Florists' Club of Boston, for an informal garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Halifax Garden Company, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 

Handy Greenhouses, for a group of saintpaulias. 

Littlefield-Wyman Nurseries, Incorporated, for an intimate, informal gar- 
den at the Spring Show. 

The Merrys, for a display of hemerocallis. 

The Merrys, for a display of iris. 

National Association of Gardeners, Newport, Rhode Island Branch, for an 
informal rose garden at the Spring Show. 

George H. Pride, for a display of daffodils. 

Andrew E. Simoni (at N.A.L.S. Show) , for Lily Limelight. 

Marinus Vander Pol, for an exhibit of tree peonies at the Spring Show. 

Bronze Medals 

American Begonia Society, Bessie Raymond Buxton Branch, for a group 
of begonias at the Spring Show. 

Arrowhead Gardens, Incorporated, for a display of miscellaneous cut 
flowers. 

Robert Bienberm, designer for Sidney Hoffman, Florist, for a display of 
cut flowers. 

James Cass, for a display of roses. 

Sidney Hoffman, for a display of miscellaneous cut flowers. 

Karl P. Jones, Barrington, Rhode Island, for a display of roses. 

35 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1960 

Harold W. Knowlton, for a display of iris. 

William F. Lommerse, for a display of lily-flowering tulips. 

Park Florist, for a display of miscellaneous cut flower arrangements at 
the Spring Show. 

George H. Pride, for a display of bearded iris. 

Simmons School of Floral Design, for a display of fall flower arrange- 
ments. 

John Thibodeau, for a display of miniature bulbs. 

First Class Certificate 

Rose Seventeen, exhibited by Peirce Brothers, Incorporated. 

Awards of Merit 

Rose Hawaii, exhibited by Jackson & Perkins Company, Newark, New 
York. 

Rose Topper, exhibited by Johnson Brothers Rose Growers. 

Symphoricarpos "Mother of Pearl," exhibited by the Arnold Arboretum. 

Votes of Commendation 

Carnation seedling Susan, exhibited by Patten & Company, Incorporated, 
at the Spring Show. 

"Countries of the World," staged by George Moore. 

"Hub Wheel," staged by Margaret Stone. 

Cultural Certificates 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a display of snapdragons at the Spring Show. 

Albert A. Hulley, for a collection of hybrid clematis at the Spring Show. 

William F. Lommerse, for a display of tulips. 

Charles H. Lothrop, for a display of double snapdragons at the Spring 
Show. 

Elsbeth C. Ohlson, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 

Edna Roberts, York, Maine, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring 
Show. 

John F. Sullivan, for begonia plants Sunderbruchi, at the Spring Show. 

Fred Walters, for a group of orchids, odontoglossums predominating, at 
the Spring Show. 

Hugo Young*, for a group of cyclamen. 
* deceased. 



36 




Report of the Treasurer 

For the Year Ended December 31, I960 

r. president, Ladies and (Gentlemen, the operation of your Soci- 
ety for trie year ending December 31, 1960, showed a deficit of 
$32,312 compared to a profit of $2,947 for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1959. The profit from the 1960 Spring Flower Show was 
$29,060 as compared to $16,318 for the 1959 Spring Flower Show. 
HORTICULTURE had a deficit of $28,101 in 1960 as compared to a 
profit of $3,248 for 1959. However, the magazine has increased in circula- 
tion by 5,000 and many improvements have been made to insure HORTI- 
CULTURE'S continued leadership as a horticultural publication. 

The membership income declined to $37,814 in 1960 from $45,928 in 
1959. It should also be pointed out that in 1960 it was necessary for the 
Society to undertake major building repairs at a cost of $5,000 and also 
the library purchased new stock shelves at a cost of $1,500. Our invest- 
ments income continues to increase and in 1960 was $80,218 compared 
to $71,665 in 1959. 

The complete audit report of the Society for the year 1960 as prepared 
by our auditors, Brown, Holdridge & Company, is available to our mem- 
bers who might be interested in a more detailed analysis of the figures. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward Dane 
Treasurer 




37 



Statement of Financial Condition at December 31, 1960 

ASSETS 

Cash in Banks and On Hand . . $ 1 7,338.47 

Accounts Receivable— Horticulture ....... 16,096.27 

Accounts Receivable $ 19,596.27 

Deduct: Allowance for losses in Coll 3,500.00 

$ 16,096.27 

Accounts Receivable Other 1,572.57 

Investments at Book Value 790,698.11 

Eleanor Tador Trust 7,942.50 

Capital Assets 606,195.92 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and Additions to Building . . 61,050.82 
Library 46,580.47 

$606,195.92 

Deferred Charges 35,013.74 

Spring Show, 1961 $ 4,590.13 

Prepaid Insurance and Expenses 12,400.43 

Inventory of Books, Binders, etc 18,023.18 



$ 35,013.74 



LIABILITIES and CAPITAL FUNDS 



$1,474,857.58 



Liabilities $ 60,621.30 

Accounts Payable $ 52,604.06 

Taxes Withheld 2,988.22 

Accrued Commissions— Horticulture .... 3,602.18 

Social Security Taxes Accrued 256.05 

Credit Balances Accounts Receivable 1,170.79 

$ 60,621.30 

Eleanor Tudor Trust Fund 8,531.25 

Principal $ 7,942.50 

Unexpended Income 588.75 

$ 8,531.25 

Deferred Income— Library 948.88 

Sundry Funds 867,734.61 

Special Uses: 

Principal $242,329.04 

Unexpended Income 13,187.20 $255,516.24 



38 



General Uses: 

Principal 612,218.37 

$867,734.61 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 144,687.92 

Deficit (172,191.08 ) 

$1,474,857.58 



Statement of Income and Expenditures 

INCOME 

1960 1959 

Income from Investments $ 80,217.82 $ 71,664.94 

Membership Fees (after member's subscrip- 
tion to Horticulture) 37,814.56 45,927.79 

Rentals 14,385.41 15,375.96 

Spring Show 61,122.11 36,953.72 

Autumn Show (4,732.38) (2,974.86) 

Horticulture Profit or Loss (28,101.19) 3,248.12 

Other Receipts 1,037.50 3,110.00 

$161,743.83 

EXPENDITURES 

Building Expenses $ 46,504.80 

Library Expenses 21,514.73 

Office and General Expenses 79,324.93 

Awards, Lectures, Medals and Certificates: 

Lectures paid from General Funds 805.70 

Prizes, Medals, and Certificates paid from 

General Funds 2,164.40 

Prizes, Medals, and Certificates Paid from 

Spring Show 32,062.01 

Medals, Lectures, etc. paid from Restricted 

Funds 1,848.00 

Awards at Shows paid from Restricted 

Funds 3,713.36 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expenses 4,045.73 

$191,983.66 

Net Profit (or Loss) -All Funds $(30,239.83) 

Elimination of Expenses Included Above Paid 

from Income of Restricted Funds $ 7,531.25 

$(22,708.58) 
Elimination of Income Included Above Allo- 
cated to Restricted Funds $ 9,603.51 

Net Profit (or Loss ) -General Funds $(32,312.09 ) 

39 



$173,305.67 


$ 41,667.21 
17,155.16 
76,261.03 


1,621.48 


2,085.36 


20,636.05 


2,451.04 


3,814.91 
3,560.10 


$169,252.34 


$ 4,053.33 


$ 8,131.87 


$ 12,185.20 


$ 9,238.06 


$ 2,947.14 



T 



Report of Committee on Library for 1960 

jt^P^here have been three major projects in the library program for 
the year. First, repairing, cleaning and oiling have put the rare 
book collection into excellent condition. Second, the moving of 2,600 
volumes to the stacks has relieved the reading room shelves of crowding, 
and provided room for ten years' growth. Third, the sale of duplicate 
copies of rare books has added almost $3,000 to the library fund, and 
of 154 works offered for sale only 27 are left. 

As of January 1, 1960, there were 31,000 volumes in the library, and 
450 volumes were added during 1960. 

Money for the support of the library comes from two sources. Trust 
funds give an annual income of $2,000 which is spent for the purchase 
and binding of books. Operating expenses are appropriated each year 
from general funds of the Society. In 1960, the appropriation was $21,500 
of which we spent $19,500. 

The library loaned 4,000 volumes, nearly half of them going by mail 
to other parts of the country. 

For the able and pleasant operation of the library and its appearance, 
we owe our sincere thanks to Miss Dorothy S. Manks and her staff. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Albert C. Burrage, Chairman 
Committee on the Library 




40 



Books Added to the Library 
May 1, 1960-May 1, 1961 

Gardening 

Bedford (New York) Garden Club. The Bedford gardeners almanac. 

New York, 1960 
Biles, R. E. The complete book of garden magic; new rev. ed. Chi- 
cago, 1961 
Coats, Peter, ed. A book of gardens, from House and Garden (English 

ed.) London, 1960 
Cutler, K. N. The beginning gardener. New York, 1961 
Garden Club of Wilmington. Humor and humus. Wilmington, Del., 

1960 
Hancock, J. E. The school garden, book 3. London, 1959 
Hersey, Jean. Carefree gardening: new and easier ways to have an 

abundance of flowers and vegetables. Princeton, N. J., 1961 
Mason, H. Your garden in the South. Princeton, N. J., 1960 
Oakman, H. Gardening in Queensland. Brisbane, Australia, 1959 
Ochse, J. J. (and others) Tropical and subtropical agriculture. New 
York, 1961. 2 vols. 

Smiley, N. Tropical planting and gardening for south Florida and the 
West Indies. Miami, 1961 

Steffek, E. F. Gardening the easy way. New York, 1961 

Stout, R. Gardening without work for the aging, the busy and the in- 
dolent. New York, 1961 

Sunset Magazine. Sunset western garden book; rev. (2d) ed. Menlo 
Park, Calif., 1961 

Encyclopedias 

Everett, T. H., ed. New illustrated encyclopedia of gardening, un- 
abridged. New York, 1960. 6 vols. 

Taylor, N., ed. Taylor's encyclopedia of gardening; 4th ed. revised, en- 
larged and reset. Boston, 1961 

Propagation and Pruning 

Mahlstede, J. P. and Fletcher, W. E. Storage of nursery stock. Ames, 
Iowa, 1960 

Rowe-Dutton, P. Mist propagation of cuttings. Farnham Royal, Eng., 
1959 

41 



Books Added to the Library 

Directory 

Stephenson, J. W., comp. The gardener's directory. Garden City, 
N. Y., 1960 

Auxiliary Sciences 

Soils 

Buckman, H. O. and Brady, N. C. Nature and properties of soils; 6th 
ed. New York, 1960 

Hanna, L. W. Handbook of agricultural chemicals. Forest Grove, Ore., 
1959 

Longgood, W. The poisons in your food. New York, 1960 
McVickar, M. H. Using commercial fertilizers: commercial fertilizers 
and crop production. Danville, 111., 1961 

Rodale, J. I. The complete book of composting. Emmaus, Pa., 1960 
Teuscher, H. and Adler, R. The soil and its fertility. New York, 1960 

Diseases and Pests 

Chupp, C. and Sherf, A. F. Vegetable diseases and their control. New 
York, 1960 

Rohm and Haas Company. Compendium of plant diseases. Phila- 
delphia, 1959 

Westcott, C. Plant disease handbook; 2d ed. Princeton, N. J., 1960 

Acme Quality Paints, Inc. A thousand answers on pest control. Detroit, 

1960 
American Association for the Advancement of Science. (Section on 

Agriculture) Biological and chemical control of plant and animal 

pests. Washington, D. C, 1960 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Biological control of plant pests. Brooklyn, 

N. Y., 1960 
Frear, D. E. H., comp. Pesticide handbook. State College, Pa., 1960 
de Ong, E. R. Chemical and natural control of pests. New York, 1960 

Flower Gardening 

Anderson, E. B. Dwarf bulbs for the rock garden. London, 1959. 
Anderson, E. B. Rock gardens. Baltimore, 1959 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Handbook on bulbs. Brooklyn, N. Y., 1959 
Cumming, R. W. and Lee, R. E. Contemporary perennials. New York, 
1960 

42 



Books Added to the Library 

Genders, R. Collecting hardy plants for interest and profit. London; 

New York, 1959 
Graham, V. E. (and others) Landscaping the home grounds. Jackson, 

Miss., 1960 
Korn, M. Here's how to garden in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Dallas, 

1960 
Schwarzenbach, H., illus. Flowers in color: text by W. Rytz, trans, and 

adapted by H. L. Edlin. New York, 1960 
Steiner, M. L. Philippine ornamental plants and their care. Manila, 

1952 
Sunset Magazine. Garden work centers. Menlo Park, Calif., 1960 

Greenhouse and House Plants 

Ball, G. J., Inc. The Ball red book; 9th ed. West Chicago, 1957 

Crockett, J. U. Greenhouse gardening as a hobby. Garden City, N. Y., 
1961 

Fischer, P. Variegated foliage plants. London, 1960 
Goold-Adams, D. The cool greenhouse and conservatory. London, 1959 
Stevenson, V. The care and cultivation of indoor plants. New York, 
1959 

Monographs 

Albera, A. E. Making roses behave. Los Angeles, 1960 

Allen, H. H. Roses, growing for exhibiting. Princeton, N. J., 1961 

Behrends, D. S. Begonias slanted toward the beginner. Terre Haute, 

Ind., 1960 
Bowers, C. G. Rhododendrons and azaleas; 2d ed. New York, 1960 
Brilmayer, B. All about begonias. New York, 1960 
Brown, B. F. Florida's beautiful crotons. Indialantic, Fla., 1960 

Clarke, J. H. Getting started with rhododendrons and azaleas. New 
York, 1960 

Dawson, R. B. Lawns for garden and playing field. London; Balti- 
more, 1960 
Genders, R. Miniature roses. London, 1960 
Genders, R. The paeony. London, 1961 
Higgins, V. Succulents in cultivation (cacti included) London, 1960 

Jacobsen, H. (and others) Handbook of succulent plants; English rev. 

ed. London, 1960. 3 vols. 
Jenkins, D. H. The complete book of roses. New York, 1956 

Leese, O. and Leese, M. Desert plants: cacti and succulents in the wild 
and in cultivation. London, 1960 

43 



Books Added to the Library 

Marsclen, C. Marnmillarias. London, 1957 

Mitchell, S. B. Iris for every garden; rev. ed., revised bv Molly Price. 
New York, 1960 

Noble, M. You can grow orchids; rev. 2d ed. Jacksonville, Fla., 1960 

North American Lily Society. Lily yearbook, 1960. Geneva, N. Y., 1960 

Royal Horticultural Society. Daffodil and tulip year book, 1961. London, 
1960 

Royal Horticultural Society. Lily year book, 24. London, 1961 

Scott, S. H. Observer's book of cacti and other succulents. London, 
1959 

Schery, R. W. The Lawn book. New York, 1961 

South Florida Orchid Society. Register of orchid awards and judging 
handbook. Miami, 1960 

Sunset Magazine. Sunset's lawn and ground cover book. Menlo Park, 
Calif., 1960 

Thistlethwaite, E. T. Chrysanthemums. London; Baltimore, 1960 

Thompson, M. M. Rose pruning with pictures. Los Angeles, 1960 

Thome, T. Fuchsias for all purposes. London, 1960 

Urquhart, B. L., ed. The camellia, vol. 2. Sharpthorne, Eng., 1960 

Whitehead, S. B. Garden clematis. London, 1960 

Yashiroda, K. Bonsai, Japanese miniature trees, their style, cultivation 
and training. Newton, Mass., 1960 

Fruits, Vegetables and Herbs 

Cooper, W. C. How to win prizes with vegetables. London, 1960 

Dorey, R. Tomato growing by prescription. London, 1960 

Hemphill, R. Fragrance and flavor: the growing and use of herbs. 
Newton, Mass., 1960 

O'Brien, M. M. The Bible herb book. St. Louis, 1960 

Organ, J. Rare vegetables for garden and table. London, 1960 

Parsons, H. Grapes under glass. London, 1955 

Robinson, W. P. A. The story of a successful experiment (using cloches 
for profit in a small garden) London, 1948 

Schneider, G. W. and Scarborough, C. C. Fruit growing. Englewood 

Cliffs, N.J., 1960 
Shewell-Cooper, W. E. The A B C of cloche gardening. London, 1952 

Vercier, J. La determination rapide des varietes de fruits— comment 
trouver soi-meme le nom d'un fruit? Paris, 1948. vols. 2-3 

44 



Books Added to the Library 

Community Activities 

American Orchid Society. Handbook on judging and exhibition; 3d ed. 

Cambridge, Mass. 1960 
Lewis, C. H. The judging of roses. Columbus, O., 1960 
Liebers, A. How to organize and run a club. New York, 1953 
Ohio Association of Garden Clubs, Inc. Handbook for garden clubs. 

Urbana, O., 1960 
Tilson, J. Q. How to conduct a meeting. New York, 1950 
Watson, D. P. and Burlingame, A. W. Therapy through horticulture. 

New York, 1960 



Economics — Business Management 

American Association of Nurserymen. Plant patents, supplement 1958- 
1959. Washington, D. C, 1959 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Trees and shrubs— where to buy them. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1960 

Klette, G. Selbstbedienung im Gartenbau (the self-service garden cen- 
ter) Aachen, Germany, 1960 

Price, T. A., ed. Retail florist's handbook. Holly wood-by-the-sea, Fla., 
1960 



Nature Study 

Milne, L. J. and Milne, M. The balance of nature. New York, 1961 

Shimer, J. A. This sculptured earth: the landscape of America. New 
York, 1959 

Teale, E. W. Journey into summer. New York, 1960 

White, L. B., Jr. Life in the shifting dunes. Boston, 1960 



Garden Design 

Allen, Lady Allen of Hurtwood, and Jellicoe, S. The things we see: gar- 
dens. Harmondsworth, Eng.; Baltimore, 1953 

American Institute of Architects, New York Chapter. Planning and com- 
munity appearance. New York, 1958 

Arco Publishing Company. How to build outdoor fireplaces and furni- 
ture. New York, 1957 

Boltz, H. O. The landscape use of shrubs and vines, according to form, 
color, and texture, soil and culture. St. Louis, 1958 

45 



Books Added to the Library 

Lawrence, E. Gardens in winter. New York, 1961 

Lees, C. B. Budget landscaping. New York, 1960 

Merritt, A. L. An artist's garden tended, painted, described. London, 
1908 

Schwarzenbach, H., illus. Decorative trees and shrubs, . . . trans, by 
H. L. Edlin. New York, 1960 

Sunset Magazine. Ideas for entryways and front gardens. Menlo Park, 
Calif., 1961 

Tunnard, C. and Reed, H. H. American skyline. Boston, 1955 

Van Rensselaer, M. Art out-of-doors (reprint of 1st ed.) Philadelphia, 
1959 



Botany 

Allard, R. W. Principles of plant breeding. New York, 1960 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Handbook on breeding ornamental plants. 
Brooklyn, N.Y., 1959 

Gardner, E. J. Principles of genetics. New York, 1960 

Mallette, M. F. (and others) Biochemistry of plants and animals, an 
introduction. New York, 1960 

Murphey, E. V. A. Indian uses of native plants. Palm Desert, Calif., 
1959 

Pechey, J., comp. The English herbal of physical plants (an abridge- 
ment of the English portion of The Compleat herbal of physical plants. 
1694) London; New York, 1951 

Sinnott, E. W. (and others) Principles of genetics; 5th ed. New York, 
1958 



Monographs 

Ames, B., illus. Drawings of Florida orchids; 2d ed. Cambridge, Mass., 

1959 
Backeberg, C. Die Cactaceae, bd. 4. Jena, 1960 

Hesler, L. R. Mushrooms of the Great Smokies. Knoxville, Tenn., 1960 
Legro, R. A. H. The cytological background of cyclamen breeding. 

Wageningen, Holland, 1959 
McCurrach, J. C. Palms of the world. New York, 1960 
Turrill, W. B. A supplement to Elwes' Monograph of the genus Lilium, 

part 8. London, 1960 
Wright, N. P. Orquideas de Mexico. Mexico City, 1958 

46 



Books Added to the Library 

Floras— North America 

Burns, E. M. National conservation guide. Philadelphia, 1961 
Cavanna, B. The first book of wild flowers. New York, 1961 
Earle, O. E. State trees. New York, 1960 

Phillips, G. R. Forest trees of Oklahoma, how to know them; ed. 9. 
Oklahoma City, 1959 

Pesman, M. W. Meet the natives; 6th ed. rev. Denver, 1959 

Ross, C. R. Trees to know in Oregon; rev. ed. Corvallis, 1959 

Symonds, G. W. D. Tree identification book: a new method for the 
practical identification and recognition of trees. New York, 1958 

Upham, A. W. The flora of Windham County, Connecticut, a check list. 
Storrs, 1959 

Vines, R. A. Trees, shrubs and woody vines of the Southwest. Austin, 
Texas, 1960 

Floras— Other Countries 

Clapham, A. R. (and others) Flora of the British Isles, atlas, pt 2. 
London, 1960 

Frear, M. D. Our familiar island trees sponsored by the Outdoor Circle 
of Honolulu. Boston, 1929 

Hargreaves, D. and Hargreaves, B. Tropical blossoms of the Caribbean. 
Portland, Ore., 1960 

Hulme, M. M. Wild flowers of Natal. Pietermaritzburg, S. A., 1954 

Laing, R. M. Plants of New Zealand; 6th ed. Christchurch, 1957 

Praeger, R. L. Irish topographical botany. Dublin, 1901 

Weisz, J. Blumen der Alpen. Stuttgart, 1957 

Worthington, T. B. Ceylon trees. Colombo, 1959 

Essays, Poetry, Art 

Hatton, R. G. Handbook of plant and floral ornament. New York, 1960 

Knight, R. P. The landscape, a didactic poem. London, 1795 

Lehner, E. Folklore and symbolism of flowers, plants and trees. New 
York, 1960 

Parmenter, J. Helio-tropes, or new posies for sundials. London, 1904 
(first published 1625) 

Flower Arrangement 

Bayles, V. T. Chrysanthemums indoors. New York, 1960 

Benz, M. Flowers, free form— interpretive design. Houston, Texas, 1960 

47 



Books Added to the Ld3rary 

Bunbury, A. Floral art for pleasure. Newton, Mass., 1961 

Clements, J. Floral roundabout. London, 1959 

Hayes, N. G. Woodforms and dry material. Berkeley, Calif., 1960 

Hunt, F. B. Floral decorations for your church. Philadelphia, 1960 

Nishikawa, I. Floral art of Japan; 11th ed. Tokyo, 1960 

Nishizaka, S., ed. Modern Ikebana. Kyoto, 1959 

Ohara, H. Everyone's flower arrangement. Tokyo, 1957 

Pa tteson -Knight, F. Arranging flowers for the sanctuary. New York, 
1961 

Ray, Mrs. E. R. Decorations for Christmas. Greenfield, Ohio, 1960 

Roberts, P. E. Simplified flower arrangements. New York, 1960 

S chaffer, F. Driftwood in the home. New York, 1960 

Sparnon, N. J. Japanese flower arrangement, classical and modern. 
Tokyo; Rutland, Vt., 1960 

Swift, L. Flower arranging. New York, 1960 

Thompson, M. E. The driftwood book. Princeton, N. J., 1960 

Tiffany & Company. Tiffany table settings. New York, 1960 

Van Rensselaer, E. Decorating with seed mosaics, chipped glass, and 
plant materials. Princeton, N. J., 1960 

Travel. Plant Hunting 

Douglas. D. Journal kept by David Douglas during his travels in North 
America, 1823-1827. New York, 1959 

Douglas, W. O. My wilderness, the Pacific West. New York, 1960 

Faure, G. Gardens of Rome. Fair Lawn, N. J., 1960 

Frohman, L. H. and Elliot, J. A pictorial guide to American gardens. 

New York, 1960 
Hadfield, M. Gardening in Britain, an historical outline. London, 1960 
Hale, A. M. Pioneer nurserymen of New Zealand. Wellington, N. Z., 

1955 
Ishimoto, T. The art of the Japanese garden. New York, 1958 
Sunset Magazine. Hawaii, a guide to all the islands. Menlo Park, 

Calif., 1960 
Takakura, G. Invitation to Japanese gardens. Kyoto, 1960 

Children's Books 

Bulla, C. R. A tree is a plant. New York, 1961 

Cavanna, B . The first book of wild flowers. New York, 1961 

Jordan, H. J. How a seed grows. New York, 1961 

Witte, E. K. The adventure book of forest wonders. New York, 1960 

48 



Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts 
to the Library from the following donors: 

Ames, Mrs. John S. 

Bateman, James. The orchidaceae of Mexico and Guatemala. 
Sander, F. Reichenbachia : orchids illustrated and described, first 
series; imperial edition. 2 vols, in 4. 

Blue, Mrs. Gertrude. 

Bailey, L. H. Hortus second. 

Bailey, L. H. The nursery manual. 

Barron, L. Gardening for the small place. 

Brown, W. Tuberous begonias, a complete guide for amateurs and 
specialists. 

Chabot, E. Greenhouse gardening for everyone. 

DeLaMare, A. T. Garden guide; 7th edition. 

Free, M. All about African violets. 

Free, M. All about house plants. 

Gray, A. Gray's manual of botany; 8th ed., largely rewritten and ex- 
panded by M. L. Fernald. 

Hersey, J. Garden in your window. 

Hottes, A. C. How to increase plants. 

Hutchinson, J. Common wild flowers. 

Koon, R. Out in the open. 

Logan, H. B. and Cosper, L. C. Orchids are easy to grow. 

Northen, R. T. Home orchid growing. 

Post, K. Florist crop production and marketing. 

Putz, A. The garden note book . . . week by week. 

Robbins, W. W. and Weier, T. E. Botany, an introduction to plant 
science. 

Soules, K. Modern florist designing. 

Sprague, H. B. Better lawns. 

Westcott, C. Anyone can grow roses; 2d edition. 

Buttrick, Miss Helen 

Young, C. S. Nature's fashions in lady's slippers. 
Collection of photographs of Vermont orchids. 

Caldwell, Miss Dorothy Walcott. 

Rohde, E. S. A garden of herbs. 

Greenwood, Mrs. Brigitta. 

Plants for the library 

Muller, Erhart. 

Fox, H. M. Gardening with herbs for flavor and fragrance. 

Freeman, M. B. Herbs for the mediaeval household. 

Webster, H. N. Herbs, how to grow them and how to use them. 

49 



Gifts to the Library 

Shattuck, Dr. George C. 
Barry, P. The fruit garden. 
Duryea, M. P. Gardens in and about town. 
Grigor, J. Arboriculture. 
King, L. Y. The beginner's garden. 
Nichols, R. S. English pleasure gardens. 
Palmer, F. E. Milady's house plants. 
Richter, J. P. F. Flower, fruit and thorn pieces, series 1 and 2, trans. 

from the German. 
Willfcms, H. T., ed. Window gardening. 

Snow, Samuel Peaslee 

Hall, A. D. The soil, an introduction to the scientific study of the 
growth of crops; 4th edition. 

Holmes, E. Commercial rose culture under glass and outdoors; 2d 
edition. 

Huttenlocher, F. Garden club handbook. 

National Council of State Garden Clubs, Inc. A handbook for flower 
show judging. 

New England farmer, vol. 2. 

Taylor, Mrs. F. Garden club programs. 

U.S. Department of Agriculture. Crops in peace and war, the Year- 
book of agriculture 1950-1951. 

Weii*, L. H., ed. Parks, a manual of municipal and county parks, 
vol. 1. 

White, E. A. The florist business. 

Whitehead, Ernest P. 

Rustic adornments for homes of taste; 2d edition. 

Williams, Mrs. Frances R. 

A collection of seed and nursery catalogues. 




50 



F 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 

^ruit and Flower Mission is one of the oldest agencies in the Be- 
nevolent Fraternity. Founded in 1869, it has completed 92 years of 
continuous service in and around the City of Boston. 

The work was founded upon volunteer service and the success each 
year has depended, in a large measure, upon the sharing of time, effort 
and money by garden clubs, women's clubs, church groups, youth groups 
and yearly contributions. The dedicated spirit of all who participate is 
the answer to this long and benevolent service to elderly people and shut- 
ins. Without this interest the Mission could not survive. 

Since 1925 the Mission has received all flowers, fruits and vegetables 
from shows held in Horticultural Hall. The flowers are made into bou- 
quets and are sent to hospitals, nursing homes and individuals each 
year. The small one-room homes of recipients are brightened after each 
show by these choice flowers. Vegetables and fruits remaining after the 
Children's Garden and Harvest Show are a real treat and give variety 
and zest to meals in small nursing homes in the vicinity and to our elder- 
ly friends. One of these homes receives green tomatoes and carefully stores 
them so that there is salad material for months. Apples are one of the 
most desired fruits and these were assembled in bags and distributed 
through co-operating agencies to needy families and elderly people. 

The summer hamper work is always eagerly anticipated by the com- 
munities surrounding the seven distributing centers. 

These centers are: Bulfinch Place Chapel, North End Union, South 
End House, Robert Gould Shaw House, Jamaica Plain Neighborhood 
House, Ellis Memorial and the office in Horticultural Hall. Bulfinch Place 
Chapel, one of the oldest centers, will probably be demolished this sum- 
mer to make room for the new Government Center to be built. 

Transportation is a problem in many towns. To keep all these centers 
supplied during the summer, Harvard, Winchester, Marblehead, Dux- 
bury, Holbrook, Needham, Arlington and Newton Centre sent flowers by 
private car or beach wagon; Groton and North Andover sent by local 
express and Sharon, Westboro and Hopkinton were the only towns send- 
ing by railroad. Towns not sending flowers maintained their interest by 
sending checks for the purchase of fruit during the visiting and holiday 
seasons. Flowers coming by private car were delivered in pails and cans; 
those shipped by express came in cartons. The total number of pieces 
received was 874 in 1960, as against 904 in 1959. Mrs. Harry P. Sturdy 
of Harvard, has delivered flowers twice a week during June and July to 
North End Union and Jamaica Plain Neighborhood House for the third 
consecutive year. Winchester and Marblehead have included fresh fruit, 
jelly, cookies and canned food in their weekly contributions. This has 
given luncheon treats to the elderly people at Bulfinch Place Chapel and 
afternoon tea for South End House groups. 

On October twenty-sixth, an interesting Hamper Conference was held. 
The attendance was 40. Twelve communities were represented. New chair- 

51 



men and those who have served remarked how enlightened they were by 
the reports from the centers and that the importance of the work was very 
evident after attending this meeting. 

Directly following the summer work, attention was given to holiday 
basket work for Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter. Fourteen volunteers 
came at various times. We have had five new active volunteers this year. 
Miss Ada Wyman and Mrs. Dedersen came twice a week for the second 
year. 

Contributions of canned food, cookies, candy and dainties came from 
alliances, church groups, women's clubs, youth groups, Camp Fire Girls, 
Girl Scouts and many individuals. Lexington Morning Study Group sent 
25 filled baskets at Christmas, and, in addition, about 40 wreaths and 
swags. Home Garden Club of Greenwood sent 12 filled baskets at Thanks- 
giving, and 12 at Easter. 

Contributions from all sources were very generous and helpful in filling 
the long lists of recipients during the three holidays. One of the outstand- 
ing contributions at Easter was 40 filled baskets and $50 from the Junior 
League Garden Club of Boston. 

The distribution of 796 pieces was an increase over 1959. Gifts were 
included in all baskets at Christmas and 150 Begonia plants were sent to 
shut-ins at Easter. Trays were sent to 14 elderly Chinese men in Tewksbury 
at Christmas. 

This has been our tenth year of activity in Mental Health. This pro- 
gram has been upset to some degree by a reorganization of wards at 
Boston State Hospital. The summer program was carried on in a ward of 
134 women patients, and outings were held at Castle Island, Norumbega 
Park and the home of Doctor and Mrs. McKinney in Dedham. Forty 
women went on each outing. Patients were rotated to give as many as cared 
to go a chance for outside freedom. The picnic at Dedham was the banner 
occasion. Here the patients had the freedom of this large estate and for the 
first time in many trips the women entered games planned by the nurses. 

The indoor parties were held in two different wards. The first was 
held in a ward where there was so little response from the patients that 
we felt it best to find a ward where this type of therapy could be of help. 
In February, we transferred to the L Building where there are 22 men 
downstairs and the same number of women unstairs. These patients 
mingled during our visit and we found them all willing to co-oper- 
ate in every way. The men sang and seem pleased to have us come every 
month. This is a ward where a program of movies or singing would be 
ideal during the winter months. Refreshments have been candy bars. 
These were really appreciated and cigarettes are always welcome. 

Contributions from the Eugene Fay Fund and from the Lend-A-Hand 
Society have helped to defray the expense of this program. 

52 



Visiting is one of the most important parts of the work. The recipients 
feel that there is some one who is interested in the problems that are real 
to them and in this way a friendly feeling develops. Fifty-eight visits were 
made. 

Hundreds of magazines have been sent to the Seamen's Friend Society 
and nursing homes. Forty scrap books have been sent to the New Eng- 
land Home for Little Wanderers and to the Boston Nursing Home. 

We gratefully acknowledge the many privileges which the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society has given since 1925. One of the most 
valued assets which has been ours is the interest shown in the work by 
the members and the exhibitors. The recipients are always grateful for 
the lovely flowers and fresh vegetables which are such rare treats. 

In closing, I wish to extend to all who have volunteered my sincere 
thanks and appreciation for their loyalty and support given to this re- 
warding service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Esther L. Camfield, 
Executive Secretary 




Display of Vegetables, staged by the Boston Public School Garden, 
Woburn, at the Fall Harvest Show. 



53 



Honorary Members 



1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, Scarsdale, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Washington, D. C. 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatch ville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, Chatham, Massachusetts 

1945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1946 Walter B. Clark, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 
1947 James J. Hurley, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Georgetown, Ontario, Canada 

1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 

1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Tarrytown, New York 

1949 Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Montague Free, Hyde Park, New York 
1950 Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Antigua, Guatemala 

1950 George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
1951 Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Beltsville, Maryland 
1951 Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Milton, Massachusetts 

1952 Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburgh, Scotland 
1952 Dr. Walter E. Lammerts, Livermore, California 
1952 Prof. Alex Laurie, Eustis, Florida 

1952 Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, New Haven, Connecticut 

1953 Dr. Albert Francis Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 
1953 Arie F. den Boer, Des Moines, Iowa 

1953 Dr. Victor A. Tiedjens, Marion, Ohio 

1953 Fred Edmunds, Portland, Oregon 

1954 Arnold Davis, Cleveland, Ohio 

1954 Joseph Lane, New York, New York 

1955 Dr. Richard P. White, Washington, D. C. 

1955 Paul Vossberg, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1955 Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Milton, Massachusetts 

54 



Honorary Members 

1955 Miss Sarah E. Brassill, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1956 Eugene S. Boerner, Newark, New York 
1956 Frank Reinelt, Capitola, California 

1956 Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Boston, Massachusetts 

1957 W. Ray Hastings, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
1957 Dr. R. E. Kleinsorge, Silverton, Oregon 
1957 Jacques Legendre, Wachapreague, Virginia 

1957 Charles H. Perkins, Newark, New York 

1958 Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor, Dover, Massachusetts 
1958 Mrs. Roy Arthur Hunt, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

1958 J. J. Grullemans, Mentor, Ohio 

1959 Prof. L. C. Chadwick, Columbus, Ohio 

1959 Mrs. Susan Delano McKelvey, Boston, Massachusetts 

1959 Arno H. Nehrling, Needham, Massachusetts 

1959 Conrad L. Wirth, Washington, D. C. 

1960 Dr. H. Harold Hume, Gainesville, Florida 
1960 Henry Teuscher, Montreal, Canada 
1960 Dr. Karl Sax, Madia, Pennsylvania 
1960 George W. Peyton, Rapidan, Virginia 

1960 Henry G. Wendler, Newton Center, Massachusetts 

1961 Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 
1961 Theodore Payne, Los Angeles, California 

1961 Dr. Clement Gray Bowers, Maine, New York 

1961 Frederick Frye Rockwell, Orleans, Massachusetts 



Necrology 

A list of the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, whose 
deaths were reported to the Membership Secretary during the year. 



Miss Cynthia T. Adee 

Mrs. George R. Agassiz 

Mrs. Edward B. Alford 

Mr. Ray Atherton 

Mrs. Harold N. Baker 

Mrs. George R. Beasom, Sr. 

Mr. Harlan G. Bemis 

Miss Ellen C. Bowes 

Miss Pearl M. Bowker 

Mrs. William Norton Bullard 

Mrs. Frederic M. Burditt 

Miss Elsie M. Burgess 

Mrs. John A. Burnham 

Mr. John A. Caldwell 

Mrs. Philip M. Caughey 

Dr. George O. Clark 



Mrs. Ernest Demory Codman 
Mr. Ernest F. Coe 
Mrs. Charles Collens 
Mrs. Doris M. Cooney 
Mr. Ernest G. Copp 
Mrs. Edgar Crocker 
Miss Muriel Crocker 
Miss Persis A. Crowell 
Miss Myra L. Currier 
Mrs. Laurence F. Cusick 
Mr. Thomas N. Dabney 
Miss Grace M. Davis 
Mrs. Isaac S. Dillingham 
Miss Margaret Dowse 
Mr. Eben S. Draper 
Mr. Joseph P. Duchaine 



55 



Necrology 



Miss Sarah Jane Duguid 

Mr. William A. Dupee 

Mr. William Elliot 

Mr. Samuel C. Endicott 

Mr. H. J. England 

Mr. Harold C. Everett 

Mr. Oliver D. Filley 

Mrs. Hatherly Foster 

Miss Marjorie L. Foster 

Mr. William I. Frothingham 

Mr. Edward I. Gardiner 

Dr. Joel E. Goldthwait 

Mrs. H. Maynard Gould 

Mr. Lawrence W. Gove 

Miss Helen Guild 

Mr. Benjamin W. Guppy 

Mrs. Edward Harding 

Mr. T. W. Hodges 

Mrs. Bernhard Hoffmann 

Mrs. Walter S. Holder 

Miss Bertha Holzer 

Mr. Ralph Hornblower 

Mr. Allen S. Howland 

Mrs. Carrol D. D. Howland 

Mrs. Joseph M. Isenderg 

Mr. Edwin C. Johnson 

Mr. Ivan M. Johnston 

Mr. Samuel M. Kenney 

Mr. Roger Kinnicutt 

Mr. Thornton Klaren 

Mrs. George Lantz 

Miss Gertrude M. Lewis 

Mrs. G. W. Logan 

Mrs. J. Storer Macdougall 

Mr. Henry Lowell Mason 

Mrs. Richmond Mayosmith 

Mrs. Jean Model 

Mrs. Albert J. Moore 

Mrs. Edward Caldwell Moore 

Mr. Thomas Motley 

Mrs. Guilbert 



Mrs. George S. Mowbray 
Mr. Edward E. Oakes 
Mr. Hugo Oliva 
Mrs. Lawrence Park 
Mr. Thomas Peterson 
Mrs. Gertrude W. Phillips 
Miss Annie E. Pinneo 
Mr. Sterling H. Pool 
Mrs. Henry W. Porter 
Mr. George Putnam 
Mr. Charles Rice 
Mr. Clifford Roberts 
Mrs. Preston Robinson 
Mr. Andrew K. Rogers 
Mrs. Everett T. Ryder 
Mrs. Caroline S. Saltonstall 
Mr. Francis J. Sanehisa 
Rev. Arthur Schoenfeldt 
Miss Clara E. Sears 
Miss Gertrude W. Seavey 
Mrs. H. A. Sheehan 
Mr. John H. Sherburne 
Mr. Robert L. Shewell 
Miss Emma C. Shipman 
Mrs. Harlan K. Simonds 
Mr. Robert H. Storer 
Mr. Donald C. Strout 
Mr. John J. Sylvia 
Mrs. Ruth K. Terry 
Miss Sara A. Thompson 
Rev. Edward K. Thurlow 
Mr. George H. Timmins 
Miss Mary E. Tripp 
Mr. Thomas F. True 
Mr. A. G. Wadsworth 
Dr. George A. Waterman 
Mrs. George H. Wetherbee 
Miss Mary C. Wheelwright 
Miss Marian E. White 
Mr. Oran E. Whitney 
Winchell 



oo3P 



7&P 



56 



Some Important Thoughts on Bequests to the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Consistently rising costs for activities and maintenance have made the 
Society more dependent on the generosity of its members if it is to 
contribute to the ever increasing development of horticultural influence 
and achievement throughout the country. 

Although the Society enjoys an enviable reputation for its sound 
financial condition and its judicious method of handling investments, the 
income from Endowment Funds no longer provides the comfortable 
economic cushion existing several years ago. 

Therefore, it is hoped the Massachusetts Horticultural Society will be 
remembered by those individuals who wish to distribute their funds for 
public benefaction in the field of arts and sciences. 

A convenient form of Bequest appears below for those who agree the 
Society should carry on and extend its services "for the advancement of 
horticulture." 



Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed 



YEARBOOK 19 

MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 










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|Pli$> ; ■?;-^-$w- 



,.-«*&. 



1963 
FLOWER SHOWS 

of the 

Massachusetts 

Horticultural Society 

HORTICULTURAL HALL 



January 10 and 11 
Camellia Show 



March 16 through 24 
Spring Show 

Wonderland Park, Revere 

April 27 and 28 
African Violet Show 

May 6 and 7 
Daffodil Show 

May 20 and 21 
Tulip Show 

June 6 and 7 
Iris Show 



June 17 and 18 

Rose Show 



July 24 
HemerQcallis Show 



August 21 and 22 
Children's Show 

October 17 through 20 

Harvest and 
Chrysanthemum Show 

(Dates subject to change) 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 3 

Committees of the Society 4 

Results of the Balloting 6< 

Reports of Officers and Committees 6 

President's Address 7 

Report of the Secretary 9 

Report of Committee on Exhibitions 12 

Report of Committee on Prizes 15. 

Report of Committee on Children's Gardens . 16| 

Special Medal Awards 18 

Garden Committee Awards 20; 

Awards of the 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society ... 27 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1961 ... 30' 

Report of the Treasurer 36 ! 

Report of Committee on Library 40' 

Books Added to the Library . 4H 

Gifts to the Library 50 

Benevolent Fraternity 

Fruit and Flower Mission 52 

Honorary Members 53 

Necrology 55 

Bequests to the 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society ... 57 

Photos: Genereux and Fay Foto 

Our Cover Illustrations 

Home of Mrs. William F. Barrett, Great 
Barrington, Massachusetts, with lovely old 
rambling roses and a beautiful taxus hedge. 
Two unique peacock ornaments gracing the 
steps, add charm to this en trance way. On 
the back cover, is onother inviting entrance 
to Mrs. Barrett's home showing well-grown, 
beautiful Euonymus softening the lines of 
a stone wall. 

Photo: Genereui 



1962 YEARBOOK 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS for 1961 

AND 

A LIST of BOOKS ADDED to the LIBRARY 



FOREWORD— The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the 
honor to present herewith the 38th number of the Society's Yearbook, 
with which are combined the annual reports for the year 1961. 

Boston, Massachusetts, August 1, 1962, Edward Dane, Chairman 




Hardin-Glidden Photo 



Mrs. John M. Hall 
Elected a Trustee, May 7, 1 962 



BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



President 
Vice Presidents 

Trustees 



Treasurer 



Assistant Treasurer 



Secretary 



OLIVER WOLCOTT 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 
EDWARD DANE 

Oliver F. Ames (1964) 
Albert C. Burrage ( 1983 ) 
Edward Dane* 
Robert N. Elwell (1964) 
Mrs. John M. Hall (1965) 
Dr. John R. Ha vis (1965) 
Allen W. Hixon (1963) 
Walter Hunnewell (1963) 
Seth L. Kelsey (1963) 
Harold W. Knowlton* 
Milford R. Lawrence (1965) 
Miss Helen C. Moseley ( 1964 ) 
Harold S. Ross (1963) 
Harold D. Stevenson (1965) 
Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1965) 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster (1964) 
Oliver Wolcott* 
Dr. Donald Wyman (1964) 

EDWARD DANE 
OLIVER F. AMES 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 



° Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 1, 1963 



OLIVER F. AMES 
EDWARD DANE 



OLIVER F. AMES 



OLIVER F. \MES 
EDWARD DANE 



ROBERT N. EL WELL 



ALLEN W. HIXON 



EDWARD DANE 
DR. JOHN R. HAVIS 



ALLEN W. HIXON 



ROBERT N. ELWELL 
MRS. JOHN M. HALL 



Executive Committee 

OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

WALTER HUNNEWELL 
HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 

Finance Committee 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

EDWARD DANE 

Budget Committee 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

WALTER HUNNEWELL 
HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 

Committee on Building 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Membership Committee 
HAROLD W. KNOWLTON, Chairman 

HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Exhibitions 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON, Chairman 

SETH L. KELSEY 

MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

Committee on Prizes 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE, Chairman 

JOHN HURLEY, Co-chairman 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON JAMES SUTHERLAND 
Committee on Library 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 

MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 
HAROLD W. KNOWLTON DR. DONALD WYMAN 



OLIVER F. AMES 



Committee on Lectures and Publications 
EDWARD DANE, Chairman 

HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Special Medals 
HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 



HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 
MILFORD R. LAWRENCE 



HAROLD D. STEVENSON 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 



OLIVER F. AMES 
MRS. JOHN M. HALL 



Committee on Gardens 
DR. DONALD WYMAN, Chairman 

ALEXANDER I. HEIMLICH 
MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY 



Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 
MRS. CHARLES F. HOVEY HENRY G. WENDLER 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 
ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 

DR. JOHN R. HAVIS MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY 

JOHN HURLEY HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Nominating Committee 

OLIVER F. AMES, Chairman 
ROBERT N. ELWELL MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY DR. DONALD WYMAN 




Informal Garden, staged by Peter Mezitt, Weston Nurseries, 

at the Spring Flower Show 

Awarded the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase, the President* s Cup, the Beatrix 

Farrand Silver Bowl and the Trophy of the Massachusetts Department of 

Agriculture 




Russian Garden, staged by the Chestnut Hill Garden Club at the Spring 

Flower Show 
Awarded Highest Number of Points in The Women's Exhibitions Committee 

Exhibit 




Interesting, well-displayed group of daffodil flowers interspersed with 
potted plants of silk oak tree and maidenhair fern, exhibited by Mrs. Ed- 
win S. Webster at the Daffodil Show. 

Awarded a Gold Medal 

Results of the Balloting 
at the Annual Meeting 

At 4 o'clock the polls were closed, 76 votes having been cast, and the 
following persons were declared elected : 

President: (for one year) Mr. Oliver Wolcott 

Vice President: (for two years) Mr. Edward Dane 

Trustees: (for three years) Mrs. John M. Hall, Dr. John R. Havis, Mr. 

Milford Lawrence, Mr. Harold D. Stevenson, Mrs. Roger S. Warner; 

(for one year) Mr. Harold S. Ross. 

Reports of 
Officers and Committees 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 7, 1962 

The Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
held at Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 7, 1962 at 3 p.m. with 
the President, Mr. Oliver Wolcott, presiding. He appointed as tellers Miss 
Anne Sullivan, Mrs. Lorraine Cantalupo and Miss Priscilla Curtis. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the 
meeting. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous Annual 
Meeting was waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 



6 



The President's Address 

Your society, I am sorry to report, had another year 
of substantial loss. The 1961 Spring Flower Show, 
for the first time in history, ended in a deficit. There 
also was a decline in membership dues, and Horticulture 
operated in the red. 

Our Shows, however, were of high quality, our lectures 
were well attended and our library maintained its dis- 
tinction. The Garden Committee toured the Berkshires 
and found some gardens well meriting the Society's 
awards. 

The year of 1962 has opened with promise. Our 
Spring Show was most certainly the best since we left 
Mechanic's Building and produced a good profit, and the 
figures of Horticulture are so far, well ahead of last year. 

In concluding let me express the thanks of the Society 
to our exhibitors, our staff, and our committees, and in 
particular to the Revere Racing Association, Inc., for 
again contributing their facilities free of charge. 

Oliver Wolcott 
President 




Gilchrist Photo 



Philadelphia Garden Club Exhibit at the Philadelphia Flower Show 
Awarded The Massachusetts Horticultural Society Certificate 



Colorful, imaginative display of carnations, staged by the New England 
Carnation Growers Association at the Spring Show 

Awarded a Gold Medal 





Report of the Secretary 

s a public service organization, dedicated to increasing the knowl- 
edge and advancement of all phases of horticulture, we strive to 
carry out the Society's objectives to the very best of our ability. 
We answer thousands of questions during the year in personal conference, 
by phone and mail. 

In the library, mail and telephone services are used extensively. How- 
ever, we would still like to see this educational work grow. We hope all 
our members know they can call up or write for advice on gardening 
problems, or ask for books to be sent to them. The library has all the 
new books. In recent months it has added several important publications 
on such varied subjects as rhododendrons, ground covers, gardening in 
the South, and the beginner's garden. The complete list will be printed 
in the Yearbook so every member may know about them. 

Practical courses in Indoor and Outdoor Gardening were again given 
under the direction of Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor of Dover and as usual were 
well attended. Our Winter and Spring Lecture Series included well-known 
speakers from all sections of the country. One afternoon lecture was in- 
cluded in the Spring Series at the request of some of our members. 

The Committee on Gardens broadened its scope this year by visiting 
in the western part of the state and they found many interesting gardens. 
The Award Winners were announced in the April issue of Horticulture. 
Our members will have an opportunity to visit these gardens June 29th and 
30th. A folder on this visitation is in the course of preparation and will 
be mailed to members. 

The attendance at our annual "Arnold Arboretum Field Trip" increases 
yearly, proving the value of the pilgrimage. The Society greatly appre- 
ciates the cooperation extended to us by Dr. Richard A. Howard, Director, 
Dr. Donald Wyman, Horticulturist, and the staff who devote a valuable 
Saturday to this worthy cause. 

Our building continues to be the center of horticultural activities in 
this area. Sometimes it is difficult to schedule the meetings when several 
select the same date, Saturday afternoon being particularly popular. 

This summer we will be host to two National Shows and meetings at 
Horticultural Hall. The North American Lily Society will hold its annual 
show and meeting July 13th and 14th, and the Hemerocallis Society will 
be with us July 25th. The Society of American Florists annual meeting 
will be held at the Statler-Hilton, July 15th through the 18th, and we 
are extending a special invitation to this group to visit our building and 
the Society. 

I am happy to report we are now holding our own in our membership 
department, but we must add as many new r members as possible to meet 
ever increasing costs. We sincerely urge all members to help publicize the 
value of a Membership in the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Sug- 
gestions for securing new members are always welcome. 



Report of the Secretary 

The report on our magazine Horticulture is encouraging. The new 
methods for securing subscribers are bringing results with a minimum of 
expense. The staff members are relentless in their efforts to put Horti- 
culture on a sound financial basis. 

You will all be pleased with the report of Mr. Harold D. Stevenson, 
Chairman of the Committee on Exhibitions, especially his account of the 
New England Spring Flower Show. We have again been invited to hold 
our Spring Show at Wonderland Park. The Board voted to accept this in- 
vitation, and the dates selected are March 16th through the 24th. A new 
trophy, The Wonderland Cup, has been added to the premium list. Of- 
fered by the Revere Racing Association, it is given to the exhibit receiving 
the largest number of popular votes from flower show visitors. It was 
gratifying that this new trophy was awarded to The Department of Natural 
Resources for an exhibit staged by Egbert Hans, a long time friend and 
exhibitor at our Spring Shows. 

For the second year, the Arnold Arboretum and the Garden Club Fed- 
eration co-operated in staging a four day Christmas Show at Horticul- 
tural Hall. Dr. Donald Wyman, a trustee, and his wife, Florence, deserve 
much credit for the success of this beautiful Christmas exhibit. 

It now becomes my sad duty to report the death of Mr. Sargent Well- 
man on September 6th, a member of our Board of Trustees, also the death 
of Mr. William Ellery on August 22nd, a former Vice-President and trustee 
of the Society as well as that of Mr. James Hale, a member of our Society 
for 65 years. 

I would be remiss in my duty if, in closing, I did not warmly thank the 
officers and trustees of the Society and the Chairman of Committees for 
their interest and cooperation. To the members of the staff I also extend 
my sincere thanks for their assistance and loyalty. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 






10 




Mrs. Roger Warner, left, presenting the Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal to 
Mr. Max Fishelson, Florist of Boston, for his Roman Square Flower Market 
exhibit (illustrated below) at the Spring Flower Show 




11 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 



j/ w njhe Exhibition Committee has held meetings nearly every month 
during the past year, plus one joint meeting with the Prize Com- 
-JA- mittee. Other meetings were held with the Wonderland Park of- 
ficials to check on arrangements for the Spring Flower Show. 

In referring to the other shows held during the year, of which there 
were nine, the total attendance was 15,504. The Iris and Rose Shows ex- 
ceeded the attendance of previous years, but the other shows were slightly 
lower. 

I do wish it were possible to attract more people to these shows held 
here in Horticultural Hall, for they are attractive and perhaps more edu- 
cational for those who are interested in a specific type of plant. It is well 
located and can be reached easily by several means of transportation. As 
the home of one of the outstanding Horticultural Institutions of the coun- 
try; these nine shows should attract as many people during the year, as 
the larger Spring Flower Show. Perhaps this falls right back into this 
committee's own lap, but even so we would welcome any suggestions, to 
increase attendance. 

There is not quite as much fear or trepidation in offering this report as 
there was last year. The Spring Flower Show, as you know, does not 
make or break the financial security of the society, but it does cast a som- 
ber shadow and curtails to some extent, the expenditures, if the large 
Spring Show is not a success. 

Perhaps it is the law of averages, or as the old saying goes, "Every dark 
cloud has a silver lining." It could be, because the sun smiled on us 
during the Spring Flower Show, or again it could be the artistry of the 
exhibits. Whatever the cause, the resulting effect was very pleasing to 
your Exhibition Committee, as well as, to the Trustees of the Society. 




New England Seaside Village, staged by the Massachusetts Department 
of Natural Resources at the Spring Flower Show 

Awarded a Gold Medal 



12 




Mr. Charles H. M. Foster, left, Commissioner of the Department of 
Natural Resources, accepting the Wonderland Cup, from Mr. Edward 
Gallagher, President of the Revere Racing Association, for the Depart- 
ment's exhibit at the Spring Flower Show 

We have received many favorable comments on the arrangement of the 
entire show. The quality of the exhibits as a whole was excellent. We 
were blessed with the best of weather and attendance was the highest 
so far at this location. The new building gave us more room for exhibits 
and commercial booths, plus added seating capacity. Last, but not least, 
we made a profit of around $26,000. 

These good reports are not the work of your committee alone, but 
are the result of good teamwork and co-operation from all those who 
participated. This is not something that applies to just this year— it goes 
back over many years and I think we can be justly proud to have such 
a fine spirit as the underlying force in our exhibitors. 

We have accepted the invitation to hold the 1963 Flower Show at 
Wonderland Park. A later date similar to this year has been agreed upon. 
There is a possibility of having another area available for our use, and 
if it proves feasible, this one-half acre would give us the opportunity to 
really put on an outstanding show. 

I would be remiss in not acknowledging the help given by Mr. Nehrling 
and his staff. May I also express my appreciation to the members of the 
Exhibition Committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold D. Stevenson, Chairman 
Committee on Exhibitions 



13 




Dr. Raymond Clayton 
Allen, left, Director 
of Kingwood Center, 
Mansfield, Ohio, ac- 
cepting the Thomas 
Roland Medal from 
Mr. Harold S. Ross 



■- : ;:-*«:?.ii:S;l 



Mr. Peter J. Mezitt, left, 
Weston Nurseries, accepting 
the Beatrix Farrand Silver 
Bowl from President Oliver 
Wolcott for his exhibit at the 
Spring Flower Show. Mr. 
Mezitt also won three other 
top awards for this exhibit 





Mr. Allen Hixon, left, 
presenting the Silver 
Medal Certificate to 
Mr. John Thibodeau 
for his miniature bulb 
exhibit at the Spring 
Flower Show 



14 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

In submitting the Annual Report of our Committee's activities during 
the past year it is perhaps appropriate that we note the "Powers of 
the Committee on Prizes" as set forth in the Society's Rule Book. This 
committee, according to rule 2, "appoints the judges and has general su- 
pervision over them. It also awards at each exhibition such special prizes 
as may be recommended by the judges, provided, however, that these 
recommendations are approved by this committee. It also makes all medal 
awards at the exhibitions, whether as sweepstakes or otherwise." 

Time and custom have somewhat varied and enlarged these 'Powers' 
which we choose to look upon as privileges and duties, to include the 
judging of special exhibits, (those not entered in the published schedules 
of classes )and also of judging many exhibits in several of the excellent 
smaller shows conducted by the Society each year. 

All these tasks are as pleasant as they are challenging, especially in 
view of the calibre of the many exhibitions throughout the year, which 
seems somehow to become even higher year by year. 

On behalf of the Society we express real gratitude to all who have 
served so willingly and well, as judges in the various exhibitions. 

We would welcome at all times suggestions from the members as to per- 
sons known by them to be well qualified to serve as judges in order that we 
may still further expand both the number and the diversified abilities of 
the already large list of competent persons available for this work. 

This Committee is co-operating with the Committee on Exhibitions, 
and with the Director of Exhibitions in preparing some tentative revisions 
in the Rules for Exhibitors and Judges published in 1947, in a careful at- 
tempt to bring them up to date, and to make minor improvements in 
some of the regulations and in certain Scales of Points for Judging. Sug- 
gestions and recommendations from members and from exhibitors would 
be welcomed. 

As always, we of the Prize Committee are most appreciative of the 
splendid help and cooperation of the Officers, the Trustees, the members 
of other committees, the Exhibitors and the interested members of the 
Society. Particularly are we grateful to the Director of Exhibitions, Mr. 
Nehrling and his skilled and faithful staff. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Milford R. Lawrence, Chairman 
John Hurley, Co-Chairman 



15 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

jEveral serious problems confronted the Committee on Children's 
Gardens at the start of the 1961 season. Notably there were two. 
Because of budgetary problems the Boston Public Schools were to 
be operated without school gardens again during the 1961 season and the 
Extension Service, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, notified the So- 
ciety that they were dropping out of the 4-H section of the Children's 
Show. These two problems offered a real challenge to the Committee on 
Children's Gardens and the Director of Exhibitions. 

Before the season had advanced very far it was learned that the Boston 
Public Schools would operate the large garden on the Cummings Estate 
in Woburn on a full-scale basis, instead of a restricted basis, as was the 
case in 1960. The Junior League of Boston took over the operation of 
the large school garden on Paul Gore Street, Jamaica Plain. About one 
month before the Children's Show, True Tower of the Norfolk County 
Extension Service and George Yetman, F.F.A. Advisor at Norfolk County 
Agricultural School, agreed to revive and carry on what was formerly 
the 4-H section of the Children's Show. 

The Brockton Home and School Gardens conducted by the Brockton 
Public Schools were also in full operation. Everyone went all out to 
stage a 1961 Children's Show at the usual high level of excellence. When 
the count was taken the 1961 show had 1,258 entries— 158 more than in 
1960. Some of the high entry classes were summer squash 37, green 
tomatoes 78, shell beans 60, cucumbers 47, butternut squash 30, ripe 
tomatoes 24 and zinnias 32. In the 4-H and F.F.A. section, approximately 
the same classes had large entries. 

The outstanding exhibit of the Children's Show came from the Boston 
Public School Gardens at the old Cummings Estate, Woburn, staged by 
the children, under the supervision of Mr. Bernard F. Devlin and his 
assistants. This exhibit was awarded the Society's Gold Medal and a 
Special Medallion from the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture. 

At the annual Harvest and Chrysanthemum Show in October, the chil- 
dren and staff with the same garden staged a 200 square foot display 
containing many varieties of vegetables and had 47 entries in the indi- 
vidual classes. The large vegetable display was awarded the Society's 
Gold Medal. The entries in the individual classes netted 22 firsts and 
17 seconds. Let me remind you that this is a fine example of what chil- 
dren can do in adult competition with the proper instruction and guid- 
ance. 

Vocational Agricultural students at the high school level from the Ja- 
maica Plain High School and the Norfolk County Agricultural High 
School, under the guidance of their instructors, staged excellent exhibits at 
the 1961 New England Spring Flower Show. Here again, we have juniors 
participating with adults at the adult level in the greatest horticultural 
show of the Northeast. There is no better way of acquainting the adult 
exhibitor of tomorrow with showmanship. 

16 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

Plans are already under way for a much larger and better 4-H and 
F.F.A. exhibit which in 1962 will be transferred from the small side hall 
to the upper exhibition hall and those in charge feel that while there 
were 565 entries in this section of the Children's Show in 1961, it would 
be a very easy matter to have 1,000 exhibits in this section of the Chil- 
dren's Show. 

With special thanks to the garden teachers, supervisors, Mr. True Tow- 
er, George Yetman, and the Director of Exhibitions of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, Arno H. Nehrling, what started as a real discour- 
aging year finished up as a most successful year for the Junior Gardeners 
of the Commonwealth. 

Henry G. Wendler 

for the 

Committee on Children's Gardens 

Display of Vegetables, grown and staged by the children attending the 
Boston Public School Garden, Woburn, at the Fall Harvest Show 

Awarded a Gold Medal 




17 



Special Medal Awards 




The George Robert White 
Medal of Honor 

To John Casper Wister, Swarthmore, Pa., 
Director of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Horticul- 
tural Foundation, for his work as a land- 
scape architect, gardener, author and for 
his development of the Swarthmore Campus, 
considered one of the finest in America. As 
a leader in the field and working tirelessly 
with specialized plant groups, he has stimu- 
lated interest in horticulture in its broadest 
sense. 



John C. Wister 



1 



The Society's 
Large Gold Medal 

To Alfred Byrd Graf, Rutherford, New 
Jersey, Vice President and Director, Julius 
Roehrs Company. For his monumental work 
Exotica, a pictorial encyclopedia of indoor 
plants based on a lifetime of study, research 
and travel and a sound botanical background. 








Alfred B. Graf 



18 



Special Medal Awards 



The Thomas Roland Medal 

To Dr. Raymond Clayton Allen, Mans- 
field, Ohio, Director of Kingwood Center 
for exceptional skill in horticulture. 
Teacher, author, lecturer, a conspicuous 
figure in the rose world and an active 
force nationally in Garden Club work, 
his exceptional background and position 
equip him to disseminate horticultural 
knowledge to a wide audience. 




Dr. Raymond C. Allen 




The Jackson Dawson Medal 

To Herbert C. Swim, Chino, Calif., a 
member of the rose firm of Swim and 
Weeks, for his skill as a hybridizer, he 
has close to three dozen notable origina- 
tions and eight All-America Rose Selec- 
tions. 



Herbert C. Swim 



19 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recommen- 
dation of the Committee on Gardens, Dr. Donald Wyman, Chairman. 



The Society s Gold Medal 

To Mrs. William F. Barrett, Sky Farm, Great Barrington. An interesting 
combination of several gardens, each of which is closely attached and 
related to a rambling stone house situated in the center of the estate. The 
blending of the green lawn with the open field and the hills in the distance, 
the use of Hedera helix and Euonymus on the walls, beautiful examples of 
Taxus hedging and ground covers grown at their best, with a separate 
little garden and its own pool in front of the guest house, the courtyard 
garden and several others, exemplify gracious country living. 
Two entrances to these charming gardens are shown on the Covers. 



The Society s Gold Medal 

To the Trustees of Reservations for the garden known as "Naumkeag", 
formerly the property of Miss Mabel Choate, Stockbridge. An -extremely 
interesting garden with uniquely designed flower beds and beautiful views 
of the valley from its location on Prospect Hill. An area surrounded by a 
high wall and entered through a graceful moon gate discloses a separate 
Chinese garden planted to rare trees and shrubs native to China. A garden 
where striking design and the use of good plant materials have been 
combined to achieve a memorable effect. 



■HI : 







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^ 






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0^* 'jyi 

20 



The Society's Gold Medal 




To Mrs. E. Parmalee Prentice, Mount Hope Farm, Williamstown. A garden 
on the grand scale which has grown to beautiful maturity. A large, well- 
kept rose garden, a combined vegetable and fruit garden and a sunken 
garden at the rear of the mansion, with large expanses of lawns bordered 
and interspersed by groves of mature Douglas firs, white firs, spruces and 
mugo pines combine to make one of the few remaining examples of the 
major country estate of a half century ago. 



The Society s Silver Medal 




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To Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Blundell, of Amherst, for a small, peaceful garden 
of clear and excellent design, with perennials on either side backed by 
mature trees. An interesting terrace and a beautiful rock wall and steps 
have been carefully designed to make a unified whole. The service, frames 
and working areas, well hidden at the rear, evidence the horticultural 
interests of the owners. 



21 



The Society's Silver Medal 




To Smith College- ( President's Garden ), Northampton, W. I. P. Campbell, 
horticulturist in charge. A beautiful garden located at the rear of the 
official residence of the president of Smith College and overlooking Pa'ra- 
dise Pond. This has developed over the years, undoubtedly with many 
changes, until now it is a mature and serviceable garden of great beauty, 
not only in the late spring during the commencement period but also 
during the winter, when its well-placed evergreens provide a fitting back- 
ground for the important social functions of the College and its First 
Family. 

The Society's Bronze Medal 
To Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Rose, Great Barrington. This low, rambling house 
in the heart of the green hills of western Massachusetts is tastefully sur- 
rounded by a small herb garden, a swimming pool, a bog garden and a 
rolling lawn. Excellent rock walls and steps lend strength and solidarity 
to the garden and effect a pleasing transition from the immediate areas of 
woods and open fields to the magnificent view of the valley. 




22 



The Society s Bronze Medal 




To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Walsh, Pittsfield. In a new development a 
modest home having a very small garden, unique among hundreds for the 
good taste of its design and for the well-chosen, perfectly grown shrubs 
and perennials in beds well mulched and entirely weed-free. 

The Society's Garden Certificate 

To Sterling Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown. From a large and 
impressive entrance, the garden slopes away in a series of terraces ingeni- 
ously clothed with low evergreens and other plants chosen to preserve the 
horizontal beauty of the white marble building which is framed on one 
side with oaks and maples and on the other with crab apples, Russian 
olives and hemlocks. It is of great interest to observe how the horizontal 
lines of this beautiful building have been augmented by the various types 
of plantings. 




23 



The Society's Garden Certificate 




To Berkshire Life Insurance Company, Pittsfield. An attractive planting 
about a large, beautiful office building along a major highway. Trees, a 
few evergreens and a well-kept lawn in front are sufficient to attract im- 
mediate attention from passers-by. In the rear, the parking area has been 
interspersed with various beds of floribunda roses which lend color and 
beauty to this utility area. Special recognition should be given for the fore- 
sightedness shown in preserving certain trees growing about the grounds 
during the building's construction, which now add considerably to the 
mature appearance of this otherwise young planting. 

The Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 

To Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Beinecke, Stockbridge. A delightfully inter- 
esting patio, combined with a plastic-covered plant house, opens onto a 
colorful, well-grown vegetable and flower garden. Built as a result of the 
burning of the barn last year, this beautiful addition to the new building, 
now filled with many humidity-loving plants, is evidence of the horti- 
cultural interests of the owners. 




24 




German Garden, staged by the Beacon Hill Garden Club, at the Spring 

Flower Show 




Scandinavia Garden (Sweden), staged by the Noanett Garden Club at 

the Spring Flower Show 




Garden typifying East Africa, staged by the Junior League of Boston 
Garden Club, at the Spring Flower Show 

25 







Arrangement, "Through the Looking Glass", by Mrs. Sam McCullough, Jr., 
Rocky Hill, Connecticut, (member Springfield, Mass., Garden Club) — 
comprised of African silver leaf foliage and seed head, red galax foliage, 
red ti and scotch broom— staged at the Spring Flower Show 

John Taylor Arms Award 






26 



Awards of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

The George Robert White Medal of Honor is considered the highest horticultural 
award in America and is given once a year by the Board of Trustees of the 
Society to the man or woman, commercial firm or institution, in the world that 
has done the most in the opinion of the Trustees to advance interest in horti- 
culture in its broadest sense. The gold medal was designed in 1909. First 
recipient was Prof. Charles S. Sargent, Director of the Arnold Arboretum. 

The Jackson Dawson Medal is awarded from time to time by the vote of the 
Trustees, for skill in the science and practice of hybridization and propagation 
of hardy, woody plants. The first medal was awarded in 1927 to Lambertus C. 
Bobbink, Rutherford, New Jersey. 

The Thomas Roland Medal is awarded from time to time to men and women 
who have shown exceptional skill in horticulture. It was designed by Mrs. Oakes 
Ames in 1927 and was presented that year to Thomas Roland, Nahant, Mass. 
Its face bears appropriately the representation of a cypripedium orchid, Mr. 
Roland having been particularly fond of cypripediums. 

The Large Gold Medal is the highest award of the Society awarded by the vote 
of the Trustees on recommendation of the Committee on Gardens, for gardens 
showing unusual skill in arrangement and management; and on vote of the 
Trustees to garden superintendents who have done eminent service in the pro- 
motion of horticulture. It is also awarded to persons, institutions and commercial 
firms for eminent horticultural accomplishments or for outstanding service to this 
Society. This medal was first awarded in 1845. 

The H. H. Hunnewell Medal is awarded from time to time to the owners of 
estates of not less than three acres in extent who shall lay out and plant them 
with the most rare and desirable ornamental trees and shrubs, in the most taste- 
ful and effective manner, developing the capabilities of the locations in the 
highest degree, and presenting the most successful examples of science, skill and 
taste, as applied to the embellishment of a country residence; the trees to" be 
under the most thorough cultivation, the grounds in high keeping, and the prize 
to apply equally in cases where proprietors take professional advice, as well as 
when acting on their own judgment in their improvements. The first medal, 
designed by John Paramino, was given to the Hunnewell family. 

The Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal is awarded for the best display of flowering or 
foliage plants. Both commercial and private gardeners are eligible. 

Gold Medal Certificate. Given during the war instead of a Gold Medal, also 
given to exhibitors who have already received an Exhibition Gold Medal. 

Garden Certificate. Designed in 1924, and given on vote of the Trustees to men, 
women or firms that have been reported during the current year as performing 
notable work in some phase of horticulture or as having notable gardens. 

The Albert C. Rurrage Gold Vase is awarded each year by the Trustees at a 
meeting in December for the most outstanding exhibit in any of the shows of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society held during that year. The size of the vase, 
which is a craftsman's piece and handmade, varies somewhat with the value of 
the gold. Although it was given by Mr. Burrage in 1930, the original vase was 
awarded under the name of the "Massachusetts Horticultural Society's Gold 
Cup" to Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Burrage for a tropical garden at the Centennial 
Exhibition in 1929. 

The President's Cup is optional and given at the discretion of the President. 

27 




George Robert White 
Medal of Honor 



AWABI 
MASSACHUSETTS HO! 






• /£, 







Thomas Roland Medal 



Jackson Dawson Medal 



- 1 



M 



AW'AUDKB 




It 



!#' 




s^imia 



28 



I OF THE 

TICULTURAL SOCIETY 



\A 




H.H. Hunnewell Medal 




Gold Medal 
Certificate 






v ;j 



Garden Certificate 



fIB/SEl 




Large Gold Medal 




Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal 




Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 



29 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1961 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Weston Nurseries, Incorporated, Hopkinton, for an informal garden, the 
most outstanding exhibit in 1961 . 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Mr. John Caspar Wister, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, for eminent service 
to horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Dr. Raymond C. Allen, Mansfield, Ohio, for exceptional skill in horti- 
culture. 

Jackson Dawson Medal 

Mr. Herbert C. Swim, Chino, California, for his skill as a rose hybridizer. 

Gold Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. William F. Barrett, Great Barrington, for an interesting combina- 
tion of several gardens. 

Mr. Alfred Byrd Graf, Rutherford, New Jersey, for his monumental book 
"Exotica." 

Mrs. E. Parmalee Prentice, Williamstown, for a series of beautiful 
gardens. 

Trustees of Reservations, for the garden known as "Naumkeag," formerly 
the property of Miss Mabel Choate, Stockbridge. 

Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Blundell, Amherst, for a peaceful garden of clear 
and excellent design. 

Mr. W. I. P. Campbell, Smith College, Northampton, for the garden 
known as the "President's Garden." 

Bronze Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Rose, Great Barrington, for a series of interesting 
gardens tastefully planted. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Walsh, Pittsfield, for a small garden unique in de- 
sign. 

Garden Certificates of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Sterling Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, for an impressive 
garden entrance with sloping terraces ingeniously planted. 

Berkshire Life Insurance Company, Pittsfield, for an attractive planting, 
consisting of trees and evergreens around a beautiful office building. 

30 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 1961 

Scroll of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. Frank W. Sellner, Framingham Centre, for a tropical garden at the 
Spring Show. 

The Albert C. Burr age Porch Prize 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Beinecke, Stockbridge, for skill in designing a 
patio and plant house. 

The President's Cup 

Weston Nurseries, Incorporated, Hopkinton, for an informal garden in a 
naturalistic setting, the most meritorious exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
Horticultural Society of New York 

Wellesley College, Department of Botany, for a Hawaiian Garden, the 
most beautiful exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Breck's, Boston, for a reproduction of a corner of the famous Keukenhof 
Bulb Garden in Holland, in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
Philadelphia Flower Show, Inc. 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for an outstanding exhibit of 
orchids, which the judges felt deserved additional recognition in the 
Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Cohasset Garden Club, for the most charming garden club exhibit in the 
Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

North Shore Garden Club, for the exhibit in the Garden Club Section 
displaying the greatest horticultural excellence at the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal 

Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, for a terraced Florida garden at 
the Spring Show. 

Trophy of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Bartlett Gardens, Incorporated, Hamilton, for a formal garden at the 
Spring Show. 

31 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 1961 

Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club of America 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Committee 
(Miss Rachael Warner, Chairman), for a series of gardens at the Spring 
Show. 

The Beatrix Farrand Silver Bowl 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, West Newbury, for the best exhibit of rhododen- 
drons and azaleas in the Spring Show. 

John Taylor Arms Award 

Mrs. Roger K. Richardson, Attleboro Gardeners, for the blue ribbon entry 
receiving the highest number of points at the Spring Flower Show. 

Best Blooms 

Camellia Coronation, exhibited by Mrs. William S. Febiger, Manchester. 

Daffodil Oklahoma, exhibited by Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill. 

Hemerocallis Warren Treadwell, exhibited by Dr. and Mrs. Charles P. 
Sheldon, Newton Highlands. 

Iris Annette, exhibited by Mr. Carleton J. Ulm, Taunton. 

Tulip Parade, exhibited by Breck's, Boston. 

Gold Medals 

Arnold Arboretum, for an educational exhibit at the Spring Show. 
Arrowhead Gardens, for a display of chrysanthemums. 
Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for a display of fruits. 
Bartlett Gardens, Incorporated, for a formal American garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Bartlett Gardens, Incorporated, for a chrysanthemum garden. 
Boston Market Gardeners' Association, for a display of vegetables. 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables from 
a school garden. 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of flowers and 
vegetables from a school garden. 

Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 

Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

Breck's, for a reproduction of a corner of the Keukenhof bulb garden in 

Holland at the Sprinjg Show. 
F. I. Carter & Sons, for an educational exhibit of cacti and succulents at 

the Spring Show. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Cider Hill Greenhouses, York, Maine, for a group of saintpaulias at the 

Spring Show. 

32 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 1961 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dane, for a group of odontoglossums at the Spring 
Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Hollis L. Gray, Chair- 
man), for a group of flower arrangements based on the theme "Salute 
to the Americas" at the Spring Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Robert G. Richards, 
Chairman), for a group of flower arrangements based on the theme 
"Roses in Expression" at the Rose Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. William H. Riley, Chair- 
man), for the flower arrangement section at the Fall Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Theodore L. Southack, 
Jr., Chairman), for the artistic arrangement of the entire Christmas 
Show. 

Garden Workers, for a "Colorful Back Yard Garden, to be viewed from 
indoors," at the Philadelphia Flower Show. 

Gardner Museum, for an exhibit of tropical flowering and foliage plants 
at the Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a border of interesting trees, miniature ever- 
greens and shrubs at the Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

Sidney Hoffman, Jr., for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Harold W. Knowlton, for a display of iris. 

Arthur Leiby's Nursery and Garden Shop, for a two-level city garden 
at the Spring Show. 

Littlefield-Wyman Nurseries, Incorporated, for an informal garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society, for a South American garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Committee 
(Mrs. Augustin H. Parker, Jr., Chairman), for a series of small gardens 
at the Spring Show. 

The.Merrys, for a display of iris. 

National Association of Gardeners, Boston Branch, for a garden in mid- 
May at the Spring Show. 

National Association of Gardeners, Cape Cod Branch, for a June garden 
at the Spring Show. 

New York Botanical Garden, for their exhibit at the International Flower 
Show. 

33 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 1961 

New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York, for 
an exhibit of apples and grapes. 

Norfolk County Agricultural School, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

North Shore Horticultural Society, for a Mexican garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Old Colony Landscape Service, Incorporated, for an informal suburban 
patio garden at the Spring Show. 

Packard Nursery and Garden Shop, for an informal southern Alaskan 
garden at the Spring Show. 

Park Florist, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Pine Gardens, for a Canadian June garden at the Spring Show. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for an exhibit of acacias at the Spring 
Show. 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Weston Nurseries, Incorporated, for an informal garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Silver Medals 

Amateur Horticultural Competition (Mrs. Hugh Hencken, Chairman), 
for an educational exhibit at the Spring Show. 

American Begonia Society, Bessie Raymond Buxton Branch, for an in- 
formal begonia garden at the Spring Show. 

American Gloxinia Society, New England Chapter, for an educational 
display of gesneriads at the Spring Show. 

Arnold Arboretum, for an educational exhibit of plant material suitable 
for Christmas decorations. 

Herman W. Bethe, for a display of garden roses. 

Boston Mycological Club, for an educational display of dried mushrooms 
at the Spring Show. 

Cohasset Garden Club, for horticultural excellence at the Spring Show. 

Alexander Croteau, for an artistic display of gladiolus. 

Jack Davis, for a display of carnations at the Spring Show. 

D'Errico-McGlynn Flowers, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, for a terraced Florida garden at 
the Spring Show. 

Handy Greenhouses, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 

Junior League Garden Club of Boston, Incorporated, for a display of flow- 
ers and vegetables grown at the Embankment Garden. 

William Lommerse, for a display of tulips. 

34 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 1961 

The Merrys, for a display of daffodils. 

The Merrys, for a display of hemerocallis. 

National Association of Gardeners, Newport, Rhode Island Branch, for 

a formal rose garden at the Spring Show. 
Norfolk County Agricultural School, for an educational 4-H exhibit. 
Norfolk County Agricultural School, for the Future Farmers of America 

exhibit. 
Norfolk County Agricultural School, for a formal garden at the Spring 

Show. 
George H. Pride, for a display of iris. 

Andrew E. Simoni (at N.A.L.S. Show), for Lily Palomino. 
Station Flower Shop, for a display of flower arrangements at the Spring 

Show. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a display of daffodils. 
Wilfrid Wheeler, for a display of varieties of holly. 

Bronze Medals 

Brockton School Garden, for a display of vegetables and flowers from a 
school garden. 

Michael D. Connor, for a naturalistic planting with native material. 

Jamaica Plain High School, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Karl P. Jones, Barrington, Rhode Island, for a display of roses. 

Junior's Plant Shop, for a display of dried material. 

George H. Pride, for a display of hemerocallis. 

John P. Richardson, for a naturalistic planting with native material. 

Mrs. Francis P. Sears, for a display of camellias. 

Veterans Administration Hospital, Bedford, for "Grandma's Garden", a 
New England setting at the Spring Show. 

Awards of Merit 

Carnation seedling Pink Lady, exhibited by Patten & Company, Incor- 
porated. 

Grape New York Muscat, exhibited by the New York State Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Geneva, New York. 

Tulip Pinkene, exhibited by Breck's. 

Votes of Commendation 

Rose Hybrid Tea Seedling #55-391, exhibited by Peirce Brothers, In- 
corporated, at the Spring Show. 
Tulip Greigii Oriental Splendour, exhibited by Breck's at the Spring Show. 

35 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 1961 

Cultural Certificates 

James R. Cass, for a display of yellow roses. 

De Vincent Farms, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Charles H. Lothrop, for a display of double snapdragons at the Spring 

Show. 
John F. Sullivan, for cinerarias at the Spring Show. 
John F. Sullivan, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
John F. Sullivan, for a group of pelargoniums. 







Part of a group of members and friends enjoying a tour of the Arnold 
Arboretum, Jamaica Plain on May 19, the Annual Field Day Outing 



36 



Report of the Treasurer 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1961 

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen, 1961 turned out to be a 
second successive year in which our Society suffered a loss from 
operations. This loss resulted from deficits incurred by both the 
Spring Show of $17,711.13 and from our magazine Horticulture in an 
amount of $33,191.38. The total operations of the Society showed a com- 
bined loss of $58,502.64. It is interesting to note the Spring Show loss 
almost equalled the cost of the Air Dome which did not measure up to ex- 
pectations and the Trustees voted to use part of the fund created by 
former show surpluses to balance the 1961 income and expenses. Man- 
agement is continuing its efforts to sell the Air Dome. 

However gloomy as this picture appears, our future shows the "corner 
has been turned". The loss in membership has been stemmed, the Library 
Committee has been gracious in accepting a reduced budget, the 1962 
Spring Show resulted in a profit of $26,000 and Horticulture, in the 
first quarter has posted a profit of $5,589.45 compared with a loss of 
$1,549.14 in 1960. 

Management has tightened its belt, reduced expenses and is healthier 
than ever. During the first three months of 1962 income from invest- 
ments is slightly higher than in 1961 and the combined Society's opera- 
tion, during this period, resulted in a black ink figure of $37,855.55. 

A complete Audit Report for the Society covering 1961 as prepared 
by our Auditors, Brown, Holdridge & Co., is available to our members 
who might be interested in a more detailed analysis of the figures. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward Dane 

Treasurer 




37 



Statement of Financial Condition at December 31, 1961 

ASSETS 

Cash in Banks and On Hand $ 9,982.84 

Accounts Receivable— Horticulture 19,461.97 

Accounts Receivable $ 23,061.97 

Deduct: Allowance for losses in coll 3,600.00 

$ 19,461.97 

Accounts Receivable Other 1,160.88 

Investments at Book Value 740,671.10 

Eleanor Tudor Trust 7,942.50 

Capital Assets 606,195.92 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and Additions to Building . . 61,050.82 

Library 46,580.47 

$606.195.92 

Deferred Charges 26,540.43 

Spring Show, 1962 $ 2,397.91 

Prepaid Insurance and Expense 9,449.16 

Inventory of Books, Binders, etc 14,693.36 

$ 26,540.43 



$1,411,955.64 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL FUNDS 

Liabilities $ 59,370.04 

Accounts Payable $ 50,735.67 

Taxes Withheld 2,957,51 

Accrued Commissions— Horticulture . . . 4,043.75 

Social Security Taxes Accrued 265.95 

Credit Balances Accounts Receivable 1,277.16 

Deposits on Rentals 90.00 

$ 59,370.04 

Eleanor Tudor Trust Fund 8,623.45 

Principal $ 7,942.50 

Unexpended Income 680.95 

$ 8,623.45 

Deferred Income— Library 4,019.96 

Sundry Funds 861,304.52 

Special Uses: 

Principal $235,096.78 

Unexpended Income 5,277.29 $240,374.07 

38 



General Uses: 
Principal 620,930.45 

$861,304.52 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 144,806.69 

Deficit (230,693.72) 

$1,411,955.64 



Statement of Income and Expenditures 

INCOME 

1961 1960 

Income from Investments $ 78,045.00 $ 80,217.82 

Membership Fees (after member's subscrip- 
tion to Horticulture) 35,620.94 37,814.56 

Rentals 13,583.42 14,385.41 

Spring Show 17,711.13 61,122.11 

Autumn Show (5,020.74) (4,732.38) 

Horticulture (33,191.38) (28,101.19) 

Other Receipts 1,357.50 1,037.50 

$108,105.87 $ 161,743.83 



EXPENDITURES 

Building Expenses $ 40,017.78 $ 46,504.80 

Library Expenses 15,083.53 21,514.73 

Office and General Expenses 76,953.96 79,324.93 

Awards, Lectures, Medals and Certificates: 

Lectures paid from General Funds 1,191.97 805.70 

Prizes, Medals, and Certificates paid from 

General Funds 2,868.55 2,164.40 

Prizes, Medals, and Certificates paid from 

Spring Show 17,711.13 32,062.01 

Medals, Lectures, etc. paid from Restricted 

Funds 2,050.92 1,848.00 

Awards at Shows paid from Restricted 

Funds 13,409.60 3,713.36 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expenses 5,230.98 4,045.73 



$174,518.42 $191,983.66 



Net Profit (or Loss) -All Funds $(66,412.55) $(30,239.83) 

Elimination of Expenses Included Above Paid 

from Income of Restricted Funds $ 17,574.56 $ 7,531.25 

$(48,837.99) $(22,708.58) 
Elimination of Income Included Above Allo- 
cated to Restricted Funds $ 9,664.65 $ 9,603.51 

Net Profit (or Loss) -General Funds $(58,502.64) $(32,312.09) 



39 



Report of the Committee on Library for 1961 



Many kinds of people use our library. These may be exhibitors 
designing displays for the Spring Flower Show, home gardeners 
and flower arrangers, plant breeders, nurserymen, landscape ar- 
chitects, college and high school students. When we buy books we try to 
remember the widely varied needs of all these groups, and to have the 
best books, both simple and technical, on hand for them. The annual list 
in the Yearbook illustrates this broad range of interests among our members. 
During 1961 we added 342 volumes, making our total book collection now 
31,273 volumes. 

We have, in addition, large files of nursery and seed catalogues and 
bulletins of the various government agricultural agencies, to which we 
are adding all the time. 

Although our first responsibility is to our members, we receive many 
requests for help from other institutions. For example, during the past 
year the Civic Garden Center of Toronto has been given suggestions for 
starting a garden library. A group in California wanted our comments on 
their plans for organizing a new community garden center. The Worcester 
County Horticultural Society is being aided in reorganizing its library. 
University libraries often ask to borrow books or to have information 
checked. Such loans are made as a courtesy when possible, but our own 
members' needs come first, and no rare or valuable books are sent out in 
any case. 

During 1961, the library gave out 3,555 volumes for home use. Bor- 
rowers outside the Boston area had 805 packages mailed to them. We 
would like to remind our members that the services of the library— and of 
all departments of the Society— are as close as the telephone or the mail 
box. Everyone on the staff welcomes the chance to be helpful with all 
gardening problems. Your Library Committee is always glad to receive 
suggestions for its own work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Albert C. Burrage, Chairman 
Committee on the Library 



40 



Books Added to the Library 
May I, 1961— May 1, 1962 

Gardening 

Abraham, George. The green thumb garden handbook. New York, 

1961 
Bentley, Maxwell. Soil-less gardening for flat and home. London, 

1958 
Better Homes and Gardens. Better Homes and Gardens garden book; 

rev. ed. Des Moines, Iowa, 1961 

Dorn, Mabel. Tropical gardening for south Florida. South Miami, 1952 

Eliovson, Sima. Complete gardening book (for southern Africa). Cape 
Town, 1960 

Favretti, R. J. Growing for showing. Garden City, N.Y., 1961 
Gibberd, A. V. and V. L. A gardening notebook for the tropics. Lon- 
don, 1955 
Holttum, R. E. Gardening in the lowlands of Malaya. Singapore, 1953 
Renton, P. A. Gardening in south Texas. San Antonio, 1961 
Schleimer, M. G. The Argentine garden book. Buenos Aires, 1951 

Washburn and Company. Amateur cultivator's guide to the flower and 
kitchen garden. Boston, 1871 

Encyclopedias 

Baker, S. S. Miracle gardening encyclopedia. New York, 1961 

Bishop, B. W. Concise garden encyclopedia. New York, 1961 

Nijdam, J. Horticultural dictionary in eight languages. The Hague and 
New York, 1961 (Dutch, English, French, German, Danish, Swedish, 
Spanish, Latin) 

Parodi, L. R., ed. Encyclopedia Argentina de agricultura y jardineria. 
Buenos Aires, 1961 2 v. 

Seymour, E. L. D. The illustrated home garden guide: the complete 
garden encyclopedia. New York, 1961 

Propagation and Pruning 

Barton, L. V. Seed preservation and longevity. London, New York, 
1961 

Bloom, Alan Modern nursery practice (propagation) London, 1947 

Dunkin, Henry. The pruning of hardy fruit trees. London, 1947 

Free, Montague. Plant pruning in pictures. New York, 1961 

Nehrling, Arno and Irene. Propagating house plants. New York, 1962 

U.S. Agricultural Department. Seeds, yearbook of agriculture. Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1961 

41 



Books Added to the Library 

History 

Netherlands. Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. Horticulture in the 
Netherlands. The Hague, 1960 

Williams, Marc. Flowers-by-wire: the story of the Florists' Telegraph 
Delivery Association. Detroit, 1960 

Auxiliary Sceences 

Soils 

Carleton, R. M. Your garden soil, how to make the most of it. Prince- 
ton, 1961 

Gunston, James. Successful gardening without digging. London, 1960 
(Earthworms and the soil) 

Jackson, M. L. Soil chemical analysis. Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1958 

Diseases and Pests 

Anderson, R. F. Forest and shade tree entomology. New York, 1960 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Biological control of plant pests. Brook- 
lyn, N.Y., 1960 
Frear, D. E. H. Pesticide handbook. State College, Pa., 1962 

Klots, A. B. and E. B. 1001 questions answered about insects. New 
York, 1961 

Shurtleff, M. C. How to control plant diseases in home and garden. 
Ames, Iowa, 1962 

Talley, Naomi. Imported insects. New York, 1961 

Westcott, Cynthia. Are you your garden's worst pest? Garden City, 
N.Y., 1961 

Westcott, Cynthia. The gardener's bug book; rev. ed. Garden City, 
N.Y., 1956 

Weeds 

Helgeson, E. R. Methods of weed control. Rome, 1957 

Isely, Duane. Weed identification and control; rev. ed. Ames, Iowa, 

1960 
Klingman, G. C. Weed control as a science. New York, 1961 
Salisbury, Sir Edward. Weeds and aliens. London, 1961 

Flower Gardening 

Alpine garden society. The rock gardener's bedside book. London, 

1961 
Askwith, Herbert, ed. The complete guide to garden flowers. New 

York, 1961 

42 



Books Added to the Library 

Bloom, Alan. Alpines for trouble-free gardening. London, 1961 

Brilmayer, Bernice. All about vines and hanging plants. Garden City, 
N.Y., 1962 

Fillmore, R. A. The perennial border and rock garden. Toronto, 1961 

Fish, Margery. Cottage garden flowers. London, 1961 

Fogg, H. G. W. The water garden. London, 1960 

Macself, A. J. Plant portraits and plant names, their meanings and pro- 
nunciation. London. 2 v. 

Schnelz, F. C. How to make your garden grow greenbacks. New York, 
1961 

Steiner, M. L. Philippine ornamental plants and their care; 2d ed. Ma- 
nila, 1960 

Stewart, M. B. The southern gardener. New Orleans, 1960 

Stout, M. and Agar, M. A book of gardening for the sub-tropics. Lon- 
don, 1921 

Sunset magazine. How to grow and use annuals. Menlo Park, Calif., 
1962 

Taloumis, George. Outdoor gardening in pots and boxes. Princeton, 
1962 

Watkins, J. V. Your Florida garden; 4th ed. Gainesville, Fla., 1961 
Wilson, H. V. P. The new perennials preferred. New York, 1961 

Greenhouse and house plants 
Ballard, E. D. The art of training plants. New York, 1962 
Crockett, J. U. Greenhouse gardening as a hobby. New York, 1961 
Gardiner, G. F. Modern indoor gardening. New York, 1961 
Hay, Roy, ed. Successful gardening indoors. London, 1961 
Jenkins, D. H. The encyclopedia of house plants. New York, 1962 

Monographs 

American rhododendron society. Rhododendrons for your garden. 
Portland, Ore., 1961 

Berlese, Laurent, abbe. Monographie du genre camellia; 2e ed. Paris, 
1840 

Bloom, E. V. Collectors' cacti. London, 1960 

Chappie, F. J. The heather garden; rev. ed. London, 1960 

Drayson, G. F. Dahlias. London, 1960 

Hawkes, A. D. Orchids, their botany and culture. New York, 1961 

Kupper, Walter. Cacti. Edinburgh, 1960 

43 



Books Added to the Library 

Langhans, R. W., ed. Carnations, a manual of the culture, insects, dis- 
eases and economics of carnations. Ithaca, N.Y., 1961 

Leach, D. G. Rhododendrons of the world and how to grow them. 
New York, 1961 

Lyall, H. G. Hardy primulas. London, 1959 

Mather, J. C. Commercial production of tulips and daffodils. London, 
1961 

Northen, Rebecca. Home orchid growing; 2d ed. rev. New York, 1961 

Ogg, Stuart. Dahlias. Baltimore, 1961 

Ogg, Stuart. Delphiniums for everyone. London, 1961 

Oregon orchid society. Your first orchids and how to grow them; rev. ed. 
Portland, Ore., 1961 

Peterson, G. E., comp. International lily register. London, 1960 

Rockwell, F. F. The complete book of lilies, by F. F. Rockwell, Esther 
Grayson and Jan de Graaff . New York, 1961 

Rose, Henri. Flowering cacti and other flowering plants, trans, by A. H. 
Walton. New York, 1960 

Sander Orchids Ltd. One-table list of orchid hybrids, 1946-1960, vol. 1. 
East Grinstead, Eng., 1961 

Shurly, E. Cacti. New York, 1959 

Sitwell, Sacheverell. Old garden roses. London, 1955. 2 v. 

Vallette, W. L. Iris culture and hybridizing for everyone. Chicago, 
1961 

Vogts, M. M. Proteas, know them and grow them. Johannesburg, 

South Africa, 1958 
Williams, B. S. The orchid— grower's manual; ed. 7. Codicote, Eng., 

1961 

World orchid conferences 2 and 3. Proceedings. London, Eng. and 
Cambridge, Mass., 1958-1960. 2 v. 

Fruits, Vegetables and Herbs 

Beckett, Edwin. Vegetables for home and exhibition. London, 1927 

Flawn, L. N. Gardening with cloches. London, 1957 

Doole, L. E. Herbs, how to grow and use them. New York, 1962 

Hayes, E. S. Spices and herbs around the world. New York, 1961 

Hogner, D. C. A fresh herb platter. New York, 1961 

Hyams, Edward, ed. The orchard and fruit garden. London, 1961 

Snow, O. W. Healthy vegetables. New Rochelle, N.Y., 1961 

Sunset magazine. Vegetable gardening. Menlo Park, Calif., 1961 

Willmott, P. K. Dutch lights and frames. London, 1958 

44 



Books Added to the Library 

Horticulture and the Community 

Berry, Mrs. J. G., comp. The national garden therapy manual. Phila- 
delphia, 1961 

Dooley, Mrs. R. H., ed. What every garden clubber should know; rev. 
ed. Dallas, Texas, 1961 

Fosburgh, P. W. The natural thing: the land and its citizens. New 

York, 1959 
Griswold, R. E. Opportunities in landscape architecture (as a profes- 
sion). New York, 1961 
Ling, Lee. Digest of plant quarantine regulations. Rome, 1952 
Royal horticultural societv. The horticultural show handbook. London, 

1953 
U.S. Agricultural department. Land, the yearbook of agriculture. 

Washington, D.C., 1958 

Nature Study — Bmos in the Garden 
Hay, John. Nature's year, the seasons of Cape Cod. New York, 1961 
McElroy, T. P. Jr. New handbook of attracting birds; rev. ed. New 

York, 1960 
Terres, J. K. The wonders I see. Philadelphia, 1961 
Tolman, N. F. North of Monadnock. Boston, 1961 

Garden Design — Plants in the Garden 

Bartrum, Douglas. Foliage plants for your garden. London, 1961 

Berrisford, J. M. The small shrub garden. London, 1961 

Bircher, W. H. Gardens of the Hesperides: a book on old and new 
plants for Egypt and similar climes. Cairo, 1960 

Boltz, H. O. The landscape use of shrubs and vines according to form, 
color and texture, soil and culture. St. Louis, 1958 

Crowe, Sylvia. Tomorrow's landscape. London, 1956 

Foley, D. J. Ground covers for easier landscaping. Philadelphia, 1961 

Harrison, S. G. Garden shrubs and trees. New York, 1960 

Menninger, E. A. Flowering trees of the world. New York, 1962 

Morse, H. K. Gardening in the shade; rev. ed. New York, 1962 

Pearce, S. A. Ornamental trees for garden and roadside planting. Lon- 
don, 1961 

Simonds, J. O. Landscape architecture, the shaping of man's natural 
environment. New York, 1961 

Stern, SirF. C. A chalk garden. London, 1960 

Strohm, J. L., ed. Golden guide to lawns, trees and shrubs. New 
York, 1961 

45 



Books Added to the Library 

Watkins, J. V. Your guide to Florida landscape plants: palms, trees, 
shrubs, vines. Gainesville, Fla., 1961 

Making Things for the Garden 

Fletcher, H. L. V. The feature garden. Newton, Mass., 1961 

Sunset magazine. Garden art and decoration. Menlo Park, Calif., 1932 

Sunset magazine. Sunset patio book; rev. ed. Menlo Park, Calif., 1961 

Botany 

American association for the advancement of science. Photoperiodism 
and related phenomena in plants and animals. Washington. D.C. 
1959 

Hill, J. B. Botany, a textbook for colleges; 3d ed. New York, 1960 

Howorth, Muriel, comp. Atomic gardening. London, 1960 

Jaeger, Paul. The wonderful life of flowers; trans, from the French by 

J. P. M. Brenan. New York, 1961 
Mentzel, Christian. Index nominum plantarum multi Unguis. Berlin, 

1682 
Percival, Olive. Our old-fashioned flowers. Pasadena, 1947. 

Genetics, Plant breeding 

Brooklyn botanic garden. Handbook on breeding ornamental plants. 

Brooklyn, N.Y., 1959 
Meeuse, B. J. D. The story of pollination. New York, 1961 

Paris, C. D. A survey of the interactions of genes for flower color. E. 

Lansing, Mich., 1960 
Sager, Ruth, and Ryan, F. J. Cell heredity. New York, 1961 
Thomas, D. G. Simple, practical hybridizing for beginners. London, 

1957 

Useful plants 
Backeberg, Curt. Wunderwelt Kakteen. Jena, 1961 
Baker, R. St. B. The redwoods; rev. ed. London, 1959 
Bolton, E. M. Lichens for vegetable dyeing. Newton, Mass., 1960 
Massal, E. and Barrau, J. Food plants of the South Sea Islands. Nou- 
mea, New Caledonia, 1956 
Tudor, A.M. A little book of healing herbs gathered from an old herbal 
(Gerard's). London, 1927 

Weaver, H. E. There stand the giants: the story of the redwood trees. 
Menlo Park, Calif., 1960 

Wherry, E. T. The fern guide, northeastern and midland United States. 
Garden City, N.Y., 1961 

46 



Books Added to the Library 

Floras— North America 

Anderson, J. P. Flora of Alaska and adjacent parts of Canada. Ames, 

Iowa, 1959 
Burns, E. M. National conservation guide. Philadelphia, 1961 
Enari, Leonid. Ornamental shrubs of California. Los Angeles, 1962 
Lemmon, R. S. and Johnson, C. C. Wild flowers of North America in 

full color. New York, 1961 

Morton, B. R. Native trees of Canada. Ottawa, 1961 

Munz, P. A. California spring wild flowers. Berkeley, 1961 

Preston, R. J., Jr. North American trees; rev. ed. Ames, Iowa, 1961 

Sharpies, A. W. Alaska wild flowers. Stanford, Calif., 1958 

Weber, W. A. Handbook of plants of the Colorado Front Range; 2d 
printing rev. Boulder, Col., 1961 

Floras— Other Countries 
Blackall, W. E. How to know western Australian wildflowers . . . 

temperate regions of western Australia; rev. ed. Perth, Australia, 1959. 

2v. 
Chapman, E. F. Cyprus trees and shrubs. Nicocia, Cyprus, 1949 
De la Rue, E. A. and others. The tropics. London, 1958 

Dickson, Violet. The wild flowers of Kuwait and Bahrain. London, 
1955 

Felsko, Elsa. A book of wild flowers; 2d series. New York, 1960 
Harris, T. Y. Australian plants for the garden. Sydney, 1953 
Harrison, H. E. Handbook of trees and shrubs for the southern hemis- 
sphere. Wellington, N.Z., 1959 

O'Gorman, Helen. Mexican flowering trees and plants. Mexico City, 
1961 

Palgrave, O. H. C, illus. Trees of central Africa. Salisbury, So. Rho- 
desia, 1957 

Saunders, H. N. A handbook of West African flowers. London, 1958 

Zuill, W. E. S. Trees and plants of the Bermudas; 2d ed. Hamilton, 
Bermuda 

Essays 

Alcott, L. M. Flower fables. Philadelphia, 1898 

Anderson, A. W. Plants of the Bible. London, 1956 

Colette, S. G. For a flower album. New York, 1959 

Maeterlinck, Maurice. News of Spring and other nature studies. New 
York, 1913 

Rohde, E. S. Shakespeare's wild flowers. London, 1935 

47 



Books Added to the Library 

Plants in Art 

Bartlett, H. H. Japanese botany during the period of woodblock print- 
ing. Ann Arbor, Mich., 1961 

Bazin, Germain. A gallery of flowers. London, 1960 (reproductions 
14th to 20th centuries ) 

Blunt, Wilfrid. The art of botanical illustration; 3d ed. London, 1955 

Postma, C. Plant marvels in miniature, a photographic study. New 
York, 1961 

Temple, Vere. Flowers and butterflies. London, 1946 

Flower Arrangement 

Aldrich, Dot. Decorative placques. St. Petersburg, Florida, 1961 

Aldridge, D. M. Make your own corsage. Philadelphia, 1955 

Boehm, Peggy. Flower arranging by number. New York, 1961 

Brooks, M. J. New horizons in flower arrangement. New York, 1961 

Capen, B. M. Color harmonies with dried flowers. Bellport, N. Y., 
1960 

Carico, N. C. The dried-flower book: a guide to methods and arrange- 
ments. Garden City, N.Y., 1962 

Carr, R. E. Japanese floral art: Ikebana: symbolism, cult, and practice. 
Princeton, 1961 

Clark, Virginia. The complete book of wedding flowers, decoration and 
etiquette. New York, 1961 

Comp ton, Joan. Enjoy your flowers. London, 1960 

Condon, Geneal. The art of flower presevation. Menlo Park, Calif., 
1962 

Dodson, Margaret. Easy guide to color for flower arrangers. New York, 
1956 

Edwards, N. DeK. Flower arrangement. Yucca Valley, Calif., 1961 

Fort, V. P. A complete guide to flower arrangement. New York, 1962 

Fox, R. T. A teacher's guide to flower arrangement. Etna, N. Y., 1960 

Hirsch, S. Table settings and flower arrangements. New York, 1962 

James, Suzanne. Gifts from the garden. New York, 1961 

Kittel, M. B. Japanese flower arrangement for American homes. New 
York, 1960 

Kuck, L. E. Story of the lei: customs, varieties, care, use. Honolulu, 
1956 

Lyall, E.M. Flower arrangement. London, 1960 

48 



Books Added to the Library 

Powell, N. C. Japanese flower arrangement for beginners. New York, 
1962 

Richardson, lone. Flower arrangement the American way. New Or- 
leans, 1960 

Schulke, Z. W. Holiday and party table settings. New York, 1960 

Seibel, K. H. Arts and crafts for flower arrangers. Princeton, 1961 

Soutar, Merelle. The flower arranger's manual. London, 1961 

Stevenson, Violet. Flower arrangements in color. New York, 1961 

Wilson, C. T. Art principles of flower arrangement. Philadelphia, 1961 

Biography 

Bacon, Paul. Luther Burbank: creating new and better plants. Chi- 
cago, 1961 

Howe, Bea. Lady with green fingers: the life of Jane Loudon. London, 
1961 

Humphrey, H. B. Makers of North American botany. New York, 1962 

Murphy, Patricia. Glow of candlelight. Englewood Cliffs, N. J., 1961 

Rose, L. J., Jr. L. J. Rose of Sunny Slope, 1827-1899: California pio- 
neer, fruit grower, wine maker, horse breeder. San Marino, Calif., 
1959 

Stoutenburg, Adrien. Beloved botanist: the story of Carl Linnaeus. New 
York, 1961 

Travel — Plant Hunting 

Russan, Ashmore. The orchid seekers. London 

Brooklyn botanic garden. Gardens of western Europe. Brooklyn, N. Y., 
1960 

Fodor, E., ed. Fodor's guide to the Caribbean, Bahamas and Bermuda. 
New York, 1960 

Kocher, A. L. and Dearstyne, H. Colonial Williamsburg, its buildings 
and gardens; rev. ed. New York, 1961 

Masson, Georgina. Italian gardens. London, 1961 

Melbo, I. R. Our country's national parks; 50 states ed. Indianapolis, 
1960. 2 v. 

National geographic society. America's wonderlands; the scenic national 
parks and monuments of the United States. Washington, D. C, 1959 

Newsom, Samuel. Japanese gardens. Tokyo, 1960 

Padilla, Victoria. Southern California gardens. Berkeley and Los An- 
geles, 1961 

49 



Books Added to the Library 

Ward, F. K. Pilgrimage for plants. London, 1960 

Yeager, D. G. National parks in California. Menlo Park, Calif., 1959 

Children's Books 

Blough, G. O. Christmas trees and how they grow. New York, 1961 

Giannoni, Frances. The golden book of gardening. New York, 1962 

Guilcher, J. M. A fruit is born. New York, 1960 

Guilcher, J. M. A tree is born. New York, 1960 

Hyde, M. O. Plants today and tomorrow. New York, 1960 

Miner, F. M. The adventure book of growing plants. New York, 1959 

Von Wyss, C. Gardens in their seasons: a nature book for boys and girls. 
London, 1919 

Wells, L. M. The children's garden. London, 1960 

Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts 
to the Library from the following donors: 

Alden, John E. 

Barbour, Thomas. A naturalist in Cuba 

Essays and discussions on agriculture before the Farmers' Club of Little 
Falls, New York 

Arnold Arboretum 

A collection of nursery catalogues 

Bodette, John L. 

Williams, Marc. Flowers-by-wire: the story of the Florists' Telegraph 
Delivery Association 

Cook, Mildred E. 

Temple, Vere. Flowers and butterflies 
Cowey, Stephen R. 

Abercrombie, John. The gardener's pocket journal; 9th edition 
Harkness, Bernard H. 

Sargent, C. S. Excerpts: letters of Charles Sprague Sargent to Roch- 
ester (N. Y. ) park personnel, selected and annotated by Bernard 
Harkness 

Hollings worth, Mrs. Will 

Satterlee, Marion. Pen and ink drawings of pitcher plant and wild 
balsam apple 

50 



Gifts Added to the Library 

Howe, Mrs. Kenneth T., in memory of Miss Elizabeth Ran 

Bolton, Eileen M. Lichens for vegetable dyeing 
Hunnewell, Walter 

Ames, Oakes. An enumeration of the orchids of the United States and 
Canada, prepared for the American Orchid Society 

Burberry, H. A. The amateur orchid cultivators' guide book 

Darwin, Charles. The movements and habits of climbing plants; 2d 
edition, revised 

Des Cars, A. A treatise on pruning forest and ornamental trees, trans, 
from the 7th French edition, with an introduction by Charles S. Sar- 
gent 

Downing, A. J. A treatise on the theory and practice of landscape gar- 
dening; 6th edition, with a supplement by Henry Winthrop Sargent 

Du Breuil, A. The scientific and profitable culture of fruit trees, from 
the French, adapted for English cultivators by William Wardle 

Ellwanger, H. B. The rose 

Emerson, G. B. A report on the trees and shrubs growing naturally in 
the forests of Massachusetts 

Hole, S. R. A book about roses, how to grow and show them; 7th edi- 
tion, revised 

Sears, F. C. Productive orcharding 

Stevens, G. A. Roses in the little garden 

Ward, H. W. The book of the grape 

Knowlton, Harold W. 

De la Rue, E. A. (and others) . The tropics 

Leach, D. G. Rhododendrons of the world and how to grow them 

McCarthy, Emily A. 

New England gladiolus society. The gladiolus, 1936, 1946, 1947, 
1948, 1949 

Nehrling, Arno H. 

Ho worth, M. Atomic gardening 

Seymour, E. L. D., ed. The illustrated home garden guide: the com- 
plete garden encyclopedia 

Shattuck, Dr. George C. 

Robinson, John. Ferns in their homes and ours 
Snow, Samuel Peaslee 

Bailey, L. H. The nursery manual 

Sinnott, E. W. Principles of genetics; 2d edition 
Wallace, Mrs. Charles F. 

Colette, S. G. For a flower album 

51 



F 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 

^ruit and Flower Mission has completed ninety-three years of con- 
tinuous service to men and women in many sections of the City of 
Boston. The original spirit of the founder, Miss Helen Tinkham, is 
still "sharing and caring for the less fortunate." The Mission is non-secta- 
rian. Human kindness and a friendly interest is the real concern of all 
who are closest to the work. Volunteers have always been our life line and 
they are one of the most important factors for success. 

The summer program of flower distribution begins in June and contin- 
ues through September, with fourteen towns co-operating, each week. 
These flowers are delivered by private car or beach wagon from nine com- 
munities, by express from two and by railroad from three communities. 

The joy of being remembered and the beauty of the flowers give new 
meaning to many lonely lives each week. 

Flowers remaining after the flower shows close in Horticultural Hall, 
have brightened the wards in hospitals and the rooms in nursing homes 
and institutions and our shut-ins living in one room "homes". They have 
sent many notes of appreciation for the lovely bouquets and especially for 
the fresh vegetables and fruits from the Harvest and Children's Show. 

Mental Health is a program of real concern at Fruit and Flower Mis- 
sion. Monthly visits to "L" building at Boston State Hospital for the men- 
tally ill have given many hours of relaxation and pleasure to about sixty 
men and women patients. 

Indoor parties during the winter and trips by bus during the summer 
give unfortunate people an opportunity of being a part of the community 
instead of being set apart from it. An evening trip to see the Christmas 
Festival on Boston Common was a real thrill to about thirty-eight men 
and women during the holiday season. We sponsored summer outings by 
M.T.A. bus to the Public Gardens, Castle Island, Middlesex Fells, Sandy 
Beach, Houghtons Pond and in October a "come and see" tour of the 
New England Telephone Company. These trips are a real source of ther- 
apy for these patients. 

Nine elderly women enjoyed the Spring Flower Show through the 
kindness of the members of the Hyde Park Garden Club, the Junior 
League Garden Club and the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

We acknowledge our indebtedness to the Garden Clubs, Church 
Groups, Youth Groups, Women's Clubs and individuals who have con- 
tributed in any way to this unique service during the year. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Esther L. Camfield, 
Executive Secretary 



52 



Honorary Members 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Petebson, Scarsdale, New York 

1942 Geobge H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1943 Albebt C. Bubbage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetbis, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Henby T. Skinneb, Washington, D. C. 

1944 Richabdson Wbight, Chatham, Massachusetts 

1945 Albebt Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1946 Walteb B. Clabk, San Jose, California 

1946 Mbs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Bbien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmeb, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 
1947 James J. Hurley, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Georgetown, Ontario, Canada 

1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 

1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Tarry town, New York 

1949 Dr. Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Montague Free, Hyde Park, New York 
1950 Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Antigua, Guatemala 

1950 George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
1951 Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Beltsville, Maryland 
1951 Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Milton, Massachusetts 

1952 Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburgh, Scotland 
1952 Dr. Walter E. Lammerts, Livermore, California 
1952 Prof. Alex Laurie, Eustis, Florida 

1952 Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, New Haven, Connecticut 

53 



Honorary Members 

1953 Dr. Albert Francis Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 

1953 Arie F. den Boer, Des Moines, Iowa 

1953 Dr. Victor A. Tiedjens, Marion, Ohio 

1953 Fred Edmunds, Portland, Oregon 

1954 Arnold Davis, Cleveland, Ohio 

1954 Joseph J. Lane, Mamaroneck, New York 

1955 Dr. Richard P. White, Washington, D. C. 

1955 Paul Vossberg, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1955 Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Milton, Massachusetts 

1955 Miss Sarah E. Brassill, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1956 Eugene S. Boerner, Newark, New York 
1956 Frank Reinelt, Capitola, California 

1956 Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Boston, Massachusetts 

1957 W. Ray Hastings, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
1957 Dr. R. E. Kleinsorge, Silverton, Oregon 
1957 Jacques Legendre, Wachapreague, Virginia 

1957 Charles H. Perkins, Newark, New York 

1958 Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor, Dover, Massachusetts 
1958 Mrs. Roy Arthur Hunt, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

1958 J. J. Grullemans, Mentor, Ohio 

1959 Prof. L. C. Chadwick, Columbus, Ohio 

1959 Mrs. Susan Delano McKelvey, Boston, Massachusetts 

1959 Arno H. Nehrling, Needham Heights, Massachusetts 

1959 Conrad L. Wirth, Washington, D. C. 

1960 Dr. H. Harold Hume, Gainesville, Florida 
1960 Henry Teuscher, Montreal, Canada 
1960 Dr. Karl Sax, Media, Pennsylvania 
1960 George W. Peyton, Rapidan, Virginia 

1960 Henry G. Wendler, Newton Center, Massachusetts 

1961 Dr. Russell J. Seibert, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 
1961 Theodore Payne, Los Angeles, California 

1961 Dr. Clement Gray Bowers, Maine, New York 

1961 Frederick Frye Rockwell, Orleans, Massachusetts 

1962 John Caspar Wister, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 
1962 Dr. Raymond Clayton Allen, Mansfield, Ohio 
1962 Herbert C. Swim, Chino, California 

1962 Alfred Byrd Graf, Rutherford, New Jersey 

54 



Necrology 

A list of the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, whose 
deaths were reported to the Membership Secretary during the year. 



Mr. Walter Alsen 
Mr. A. LeRoy Andrews 
Mrs. W. Cornell Appleton 
Mrs. Walter Austin 
Mr. I. C. Borgund 
Mrs. J. G. Bradley 
Prof. Percy W. Bridgman 
Mr. Ernest E. Brooks 
Mr. Walter D. Brooks 
Miss Marguerita Browne 
Mr. Otis Campbell 
Mrs. Henry B. Chapin 
Mrs. Walter Clark 
Mrs. Arlon B. Clarke 
Mr. Wilbur S. Colby 
Dr. P. R. Crosby 
Mr. Arthur G. Curren 
Mr. Albert H. Davis 
Dr. George P. Denny 
Mrs. E. A. Dusossoit 
Mr. William Ellery 
Mr. Leland H. Emery, Jr. 
Mr. Luther W. Faulkner 
Miss Eliza H. Faunce 
Miss Ethel Ferry 
Mr. Stewart A. Forbes 
Mrs. William W. Gannett 
Mrs. William D. Goddard 
Mrs. Wallace Goodrich 
Mrs. William B. Goodwin 
Mrs. Theodore Greene 
Mr. James O. Hale 
Mrs. John L. Hall 
Mrs. George Hannauer 
Miss Madeleine Harding 
Mrs. R. M. Harper 
Mrs. Anne H. Harrington 
Mrs. Sydney Harwood 
Mrs. Franklin A. Hebard 
Mr. Donald M. Hill 
Mrs. Norman Hugh Hodgdon 
Mrs. Bertha Houghton 



Mrs. Alonzo Huntoon 
Miss Minnie M. Inman 
Mr. Allen J. Jenkins 
Mrs. Peer P. Johnson 
Mrs. John S. Keir 
Mr. Herbert J. Kesseli 
Mrs. Halfdan Lee 
Mrs. George M. Love joy 
Miss Susie A. Lurvey 
Mrs. C. Fisher Luther 
Mr. Roderick H. MacKinnon 
Mr. M. Lester Madden 
Mrs. Florence S. Mayo 
Miss Martha McClellan 
Mr. Frank J. McGregor 
Mrs. William R. Mercer 
Mrs. R. Boyer Miller 
Mr. Frank S. Montuori 
Dr. Sidney L. Morrison 
Mr. E. Malcolm Munson 
Mr. Jerome F. Murphy 
Miss Alice J. Osgood 
Miss Abbie Louise Paige 
Mr. Richard S. Paige 
Mr. Harold Peabody 
Mrs. Lois B. Rantoul 
Mr. J. Preston Rice 
Mrs. Henry H. Richards 
Mrs. Jerome Richardson 
Mrs. Maurice H. Richardson 
Mrs. Russell Robb, Sr. 
Mrs. Herbert D. Rogers 
Mr. Robert H. Roland 
Mrs. James W. Rollins 
Miss Margaret W. Russell 
Mrs. Richard Middlecott 

Saltonstall 
Mrs. H. L. Sampson 
Mrs. William Denny Sargent 
Mr. Alburn H. Sawyer 
Miss Anna Weld Sawyer 
Mrs. Garrett Schenck, Jr. 



55 



Necrology 



Miss Grace F. Shepard 

Col. A. W. Smith 

Mr. Clifford E. Smith 

Mrs. Myles Standish 

Mr. Frederick Swan 

Mrs. Alden H. Symmes 

Mr. Ernest F. Thulin 

Mr. W. E. Underwood 

Mrs. Frederick D. Van Norman 

Miss Rachael Warner 

Mrs. Elmer N. Webster 

Miss Elizabeth R. Weld 



Mr. Stephen M. Weld 

Mr. Sargent H. Wellman 

Mrs. William Read Westcott 

Mr. Walter L, Wheat 

Mr. Wilfred Wheeler 

Mr. Percy A. Whipple 

Mrs. Kathleen H. Whitcomb 

Mrs. Richard C. Whitin 

Mr. Edward Clark Whiting 

Mr. Cecil L. Wilcox 

Mrs. Albion D. Wilde 

Mr. Clarence H. Wisham 





Guatamala Garden, staged by the Wellesley Garden Club in the Women's 
Exhibitions Committee exhibit at the Spring Flower Show 



56 



Some Important Thoughts on Bequests to the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Consistently rising costs for activities and maintenance have made 
the Society more dependent on the generosity of its members if it is 
to contribute to the ever increasing development of horticultural influence 
and achievement throughout the country. 

Although the Society enjoys an enviable reputation for its sound 
financial condition and its judicious method of handling investments, the 
income from Endowment Funds no longer provides the comfortable 
economic cushion existing several years ago. 

Therefore, it is hoped the Massachusetts Horticultural Society will be 
remembered by those individuals who wish to distribute their funds for 
public benefaction in the field of arts and sciences. 

A convenient form of Bequest appears below for those who agree the 
Society should carry on and extend its services "for the advancement of 
horticulture." 




Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed 










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